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Geriatrics 2016, 1(4), 26; doi:10.3390/geriatrics1040026

Psychosocial Correlates of Frailty in Older Adults

Department Health and Prevention, Institute of Psychology, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Robert-Blum-Str. 13, 17487 Greifswald, Germany
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Academic Editor: Joseph S.K. Kwan
Received: 31 August 2016 / Revised: 18 October 2016 / Accepted: 27 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frailty and Sarcopenia in Old Age)
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Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate psychosocial variables associated with frailty status. Moreover, gender differences in the psychosocial variables associated with frailty were examined. Methods: This cross-sectional study examined a community-dwelling sample of N = 210 older adults (M = 75.31 years). Frailty was measured with the Tilburg Frailty Indicator. Quality of life, depression, resilience, social support, self-efficacy, traumata experienced, and trauma severity were assessed as psychosocial variables. Logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: In total, 41.4% of the participants were frail (49.6% women, 27.8% men). Main correlates of frailty were depressive symptoms, quality of life, and resilience. Gender differences for frailty correlates were found. Depressive symptoms and perceived social support were mainly associated with frailty in women. Furthermore, age was only significantly associated with frailty in women. Quality of life was significantly associated with frailty being a protective factor in both women and men. Trauma count and trauma severity were associated with an elevated risk for frailty in men. Conclusions: The results show that the psychosocial variables depressive symptoms, quality of life, and resilience are associated with frailty. Gender-specific differences in psychosocial correlates of frailty were revealed. Results suggest that gender-specific assessments and interventions should be developed to prevent frailty in late life. View Full-Text
Keywords: psychosocial correlates; frailty; older adults; gender differences; quality of life; depression; resilience; traumatic life events psychosocial correlates; frailty; older adults; gender differences; quality of life; depression; resilience; traumatic life events
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Freitag, S.; Schmidt, S. Psychosocial Correlates of Frailty in Older Adults. Geriatrics 2016, 1, 26.

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