Next Article in Journal
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Veterinary Sciences in 2017
Next Article in Special Issue
Allergies in Animals and Humans
Previous Article in Journal
When Veterinarians Support Canine Therapy: Bidirectional Benefits for Clinics and Therapy Programs
Previous Article in Special Issue
Respiratory Allergens from Furred Mammals: Environmental and Occupational Exposure
Article Menu
Issue 1 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5010003

A Pilot Qualitative Investigation of Stakeholders’ Experiences and Opinions of Equine Insect Bite Hypersensitivity in England

Department of Animal Production, Welfare and Veterinary Sciences, Harper Adams University, Newport, Shropshire TF10 8NB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 4 January 2018 / Accepted: 6 January 2018 / Published: 9 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Allergies in Animals and Humans)
Full-Text   |   PDF [243 KB, uploaded 9 January 2018]

Abstract

Equine insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH), commonly known as sweet itch or summer eczema, is a frustrating recurrent skin disease in the equine industry involving an immune reaction to the bites of Culicoides spp. midges. To investigate the impact of IBH in the field, an exploratory pilot study was conducted with equine stakeholders in one region of central England. Nine semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted with horse owners and an equine veterinarian. The aim was to gain an understanding of experiences with IBH, and to gauge opinions on the value of the various management strategies horse owners use to control IBH. Awareness of IBH was generally high, particularly in those individuals who had previous experience with the condition. Those with previous experience of IBH commented on the significant effect on daily routines, and the associated cost implications. Most participants supported an integrated approach to hypersensitivity management, and this most commonly involved a combination of physical barriers and chemical repellents, but sometimes included feed supplementation. Overall, attitudes towards IBH suggested that the condition is a notable welfare and economic concern for stakeholders, but veterinary involvement tended to only be in more severe cases. Further research is required in the future to improve understanding, management and potential treatment of this condition. View Full-Text
Keywords: equine insect bite hypersensitivity; sweet itch; stakeholder opinions and experiences; semi-structured interviews; qualitative research equine insect bite hypersensitivity; sweet itch; stakeholder opinions and experiences; semi-structured interviews; qualitative research
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Lomas, H.R.; Robinson, P.A. A Pilot Qualitative Investigation of Stakeholders’ Experiences and Opinions of Equine Insect Bite Hypersensitivity in England. Vet. Sci. 2018, 5, 3.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Vet. Sci. EISSN 2306-7381 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top