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Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5010014

A Review of Eight High-Priority, Economically Important Viral Pathogens of Poultry within the Caribbean Region

1
Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, The University of the West Indies (St. Augustine), Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex, Mount Hope, Trinidad and Tobago
2
Belize Poultry Association, Belmopan, Belize
3
Veterinary Services Laboratory, Guyana Livestock Development Authority, Agriculture Road, Mon Repos, East Coast Demerara
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 December 2017 / Revised: 17 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 26 January 2018
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Abstract

Viral pathogens cause devastating economic losses in poultry industries worldwide. The Caribbean region, which boasts some of the highest rates of poultry consumption in the world, is no exception. This review summarizes evidence for the circulation and spread of eight high-priority, economically important poultry viruses across the Caribbean region. Avian influenza virus (AIV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), fowl adenovirus group 1 (FADV Gp1), and egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) were selected for review. This review of serological, molecular, and phylogenetic studies across Caribbean countries reveals evidence for sporadic outbreaks of respiratory disease caused by notifiable viral pathogens (AIV, IBV, NDV, and ILTV), as well as outbreaks of diseases caused by immunosuppressive viral pathogens (IBDV and FADV Gp1). This review highlights the need to strengthen current levels of surveillance and reporting for poultry diseases in domestic and wild bird populations across the Caribbean, as well as the need to strengthen the diagnostic capacity and capability of Caribbean national veterinary diagnostic laboratories. View Full-Text
Keywords: Caribbean; avian influenza virus; infectious bronchitis virus; Newcastle disease virus; infectious laryngotracheitis virus; avian metapneumovirus; infectious bursal disease; fowl adenovirus group 1; egg drop syndrome virus Caribbean; avian influenza virus; infectious bronchitis virus; Newcastle disease virus; infectious laryngotracheitis virus; avian metapneumovirus; infectious bursal disease; fowl adenovirus group 1; egg drop syndrome virus
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Brown Jordan, A.; Gongora, V.; Hartley, D.; Oura, C. A Review of Eight High-Priority, Economically Important Viral Pathogens of Poultry within the Caribbean Region. Vet. Sci. 2018, 5, 14.

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