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Vet. Sci. 2017, 4(4), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci4040054

Digestibility Is Similar between Commercial Diets That Provide Ingredients with Different Perceived Glycemic Responses and the Inaccuracy of Using the Modified Atwater Calculation to Calculate Metabolizable Energy

1
Department of Animal Biosciences, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
2
The Iams Company, MARS Pet Care, 6571 OH-503 North, Lewisburg, OH 45338, USA
3
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, 116 St & 85 Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Wendy Brown
Received: 25 September 2017 / Revised: 30 October 2017 / Accepted: 2 November 2017 / Published: 8 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Disorders in Companion Animals)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [246 KB, uploaded 16 November 2017]

Abstract

Dietary starch is required for a dry, extruded kibble; the most common diet type for domesticated felines in North America. However, the amount and source of dietary starch may affect digestibility and metabolism of other macronutrients. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of 3 commercial cat diets on in vivo and in vitro energy and macronutrient digestibility, and to analyze the accuracy of the modified Atwater equation. Dietary treatments differed in their perceived glycemic response (PGR) based on ingredient composition and carbohydrate content (34.1, 29.5, and 23.6% nitrogen-free extract for High, Medium, and LowPGR, respectively). A replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design was used, with 3 diets and 3 periods. In vivo apparent protein, fat, and organic matter digestibility differed among diets, while apparent dry matter digestibility did not. Cats were able to efficiently digest and absorb macronutrients from all diets. Furthermore, the modified Atwater equation underestimated measured metabolizable energy by approximately 12%. Thus, the modified Atwater equation does not accurately determine the metabolizable energy of high quality feline diets. Further research should focus on understanding carbohydrate metabolism in cats, and establishing an equation that accurately predicts the metabolizable energy of feline diets. View Full-Text
Keywords: feline; carbohydrate; digestibility; metabolizable energy feline; carbohydrate; digestibility; metabolizable energy
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Asaro, N.J.; Guevara, M.A.; Berendt, K.; Zijlstra, R.; Shoveller, A.K. Digestibility Is Similar between Commercial Diets That Provide Ingredients with Different Perceived Glycemic Responses and the Inaccuracy of Using the Modified Atwater Calculation to Calculate Metabolizable Energy. Vet. Sci. 2017, 4, 54.

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