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Toxics 2018, 6(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics6020031

Harmful Elements (Al, Cd, Cr, Ni, and Pb) in Wild Berries and Fruits Collected in Croatia

1
Man-Environment-Technology Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Gymnastikgatan 1, 70182 Örebro, Sweden
2
Division of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, BOKU—University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna, Austria
3
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 102a, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 28 May 2018 / Accepted: 7 June 2018 / Published: 8 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of Chemical Contaminants in Food)
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Abstract

Fruits and vegetables are considered a beneficial contribution to the human diet. Especially, berries contain a great deal of bioactive compounds, such as anthocyanins, organic acids, tannins, phenols, and antioxidants. Apart from organic substances, inorganic nutrients are also present in fruits. Some metals and metalloids are essential for humans, whilst others may exhibit harmful effects. Wild grown berries, collected in so-called unpolluted areas, are considered to be free of any potentially toxic ingredients. However, due to transmission processes pollutants can also reach remote areas and, furthermore, metal uptake from the soil via roots has to be taken into account. Thus, the presented study focused on the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Ni, and Pb in lingonberries, blueberries, and rose hips collected in a non-polluted area in Croatia. Neither Cd nor Cr could be found in any sample. Ni levels were mainly up to 25 mg/kg, in a comparable range to the literature data. No health threat is to be expected by eating these fruits and berries regarding Cd, Cr, and Ni. Rose hips, however, contain Pb beyond the stipulated limit in fruits, and also Al is present at a high level (8 mg/g). View Full-Text
Keywords: blueberries; lingonberries; rose hips; aluminium; cadmium; chromium; nickel; lead; provisional tolerable intake blueberries; lingonberries; rose hips; aluminium; cadmium; chromium; nickel; lead; provisional tolerable intake
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Zeiner, M.; Juranović Cindrić, I. Harmful Elements (Al, Cd, Cr, Ni, and Pb) in Wild Berries and Fruits Collected in Croatia. Toxics 2018, 6, 31.

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