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Foods 2018, 7(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7020021

An Overview of Chemical Profiles, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Commercial Vegetable Edible Oils Marketed in Japan

1
Graduate school for International Development and Cooperation, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8529, Japan
2
Department of Genetic Engineering, Agricultural Genetics Institute, Pham Van Dong Street, Hanoi 122300, Vietnam
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 December 2017 / Revised: 3 February 2018 / Accepted: 7 February 2018 / Published: 10 February 2018
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Abstract

This study analyzed chemical components and investigated the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of fourteen vegetable edible oils marketed in Japan. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to identify and quantify principal phenolic acids and flavonoids. In the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay, sunflower, safflower, canola, soybean, Inca inchi, sesame, and rice bran showed markedly greater activity, whilst the percentage of lipid peroxidation inhibition (LPI%) in sunflower, canola, cotton, grape, flax, perilla, Inca inchi, perillartine, and rice bran were significantly higher than other oils. Maximum total phenol content (TPC) was recorded in flax, followed by perillartine, rice bran, and perilla, whereas total flavonoid content (TFC) was the greatest in Inca inchi and sesame. Benzoic acid was the most common constituent, followed by vanillic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid. On the other hand, luteolin was the most abundant flavonoid, followed by esculetin, myricetin, isoquercetin, and kaempferol, while fisetin was detected only in sunflower. In general, all of the edible oils showed antimicrobial activity, but the growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli of cotton, grape, chia, sesame, and rice bran were greater than other oils. View Full-Text
Keywords: edible oils; antimicrobial activity; antioxidant activity; phenolic acids; flavonoids edible oils; antimicrobial activity; antioxidant activity; phenolic acids; flavonoids
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Xuan, T.D.; Gangqiang, G.; Minh, T.N.; Quy, T.N.; Khanh, T.D. An Overview of Chemical Profiles, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Commercial Vegetable Edible Oils Marketed in Japan. Foods 2018, 7, 21.

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