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Foods 2016, 5(1), 5; doi:10.3390/foods5010005

Triticale Bran Alkylresorcinols Enhance Resistance to Oxidative Stress in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

1
Food Science & Nutrition Program, Department of Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada
2
Department of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada
3
Institute of Biochemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Anthony Fardet
Received: 29 October 2015 / Revised: 22 December 2015 / Accepted: 29 December 2015 / Published: 5 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coarse Food Grain)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2412 KB, uploaded 5 January 2016]   |  

Abstract

Triticale (× Triticosecale Whitm.) is a cereal grain with high levels of alkyresorcinols (AR) concentrated in the bran. These phenolic lipids have been shown to reduce or inhibit triglyceride accumulation and protect against oxidation; however, their biological effects have yet to be evaluated in vivo. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ARs extracted from triticale bran (TB) added to a high–fat diet on the development of obesity and oxidative stress. CF-1 mice were fed a standard low-fat (LF) diet, a 60% high-fat diet (HF) and HF diets containing either 0.5% AR extract (HF-AR), 10% TB (HF-TB), or 0.5% vitamin E (HF-VE). Energy intake, weight gain, glucose tolerance, fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels, and body composition were determined. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed on mice liver and heart tissues. The findings suggest that ARs may serve as a preventative measure against risks of oxidative damage associated with high-fat diets and obesity through their application as functional foods and neutraceuticals. Future studies aim to identify the in vivo mechanisms of action of ARs and the individual homologs involved in their favorable biological effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: Triticosecale; triticale bran; alkylresorcinols; body composition; glucose tolerance; antioxidant activity; oxidative stress; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); obesity Triticosecale; triticale bran; alkylresorcinols; body composition; glucose tolerance; antioxidant activity; oxidative stress; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); obesity
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Agil, R.; Patterson, Z.R.; Mackay, H.; Abizaid, A.; Hosseinian, F. Triticale Bran Alkylresorcinols Enhance Resistance to Oxidative Stress in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet. Foods 2016, 5, 5.

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