Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Publications, Volume 6, Issue 2 (June 2018)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-11
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessFeature PaperEditorial Beyond Plagiarism: Scientific Ethics and Its Other Aspects
Publications 2018, 6(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020022
Received: 27 April 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 7 May 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
PDF Full-text (147 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Scientific Ethics)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Other

Open AccessArticle Engaging and Supporting a University Press Scholarly Community
Publications 2018, 6(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020013
Received: 17 January 2018 / Revised: 20 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 27 March 2018
PDF Full-text (3773 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper we explore how the development of The University of Huddersfield Press, a publisher of open access scholarly journals and monographs, has enabled the sharing of research with a wider online audience. We situate the development of the Press within a
[...] Read more.
In this paper we explore how the development of The University of Huddersfield Press, a publisher of open access scholarly journals and monographs, has enabled the sharing of research with a wider online audience. We situate the development of the Press within a wider research environment and growing community of New University Presses (NUPs) where there is an increasing demand for demonstrating research impact, which drives the need for improved analysis and reporting of impact data, a task that often falls within the remit of library and academic support services. We detail the benefits of the University Press Manager role in terms of ensuring professional service that delivers consistency and sustainability. We go on to outline the experiences of engaging with different online spaces and detail the extensive support for student authors. We argue that in order for the Press to support building a strong and engaged scholarly community and provide new spaces for emerging research, continued investment in both platform development and infrastructure is required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access and the Library)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Exploring the Hjif-Index, an Analogue to the H-Like Index for Journal Impact Factors
Publications 2018, 6(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020014
Received: 17 January 2018 / Revised: 16 March 2018 / Accepted: 28 March 2018 / Published: 4 April 2018
PDF Full-text (3283 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We used the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) to develop the hjif-index, calculated in a similar way to h-like indices. To this end, we mapped the JIFs of one JCR group to natural numbers, and evaluated the degree of correspondence between the interval from
[...] Read more.
We used the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) to develop the hjif-index, calculated in a similar way to h-like indices. To this end, we mapped the JIFs of one JCR group to natural numbers, and evaluated the degree of correspondence between the interval from zero to the highest JIF in the group and a set of natural numbers. Next, we plotted the straight line y = x to obtain the group’s hjif-index as the JIF corresponding to the journal immediately above the straight line. We call the set of journals above the straight line the hjif-core. We calculated hjif-indices corresponding to the 2-year JIF (hjif2-index) and 5-year JIF (hjif5-index) windows for all 176 JCR groups listed in the 2014 Science edition. We also studied derived indicators such as the distribution of journals in JCR groups according to their hjif-indices, the distribution of journals and JIFs in the hjif-core, and other variables and indicators. We found that the hjif2- and hjif5-index behaved in a similar way, and that in general their distribution showed a peak followed by a relatively long tail. The hjif-index can be used as a tool to rank journals in a manner that better reflects the variable number of journals within a given JCR group and in each group’s hjif-core as an alternative to the more arbitrary JCR-based percentile ranking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bibliometrics, Measurements and Research Evaluation)
Figures

Figure 1a

Open AccessArticle Converting the Literature of a Scientific Field to Open Access through Global Collaboration: The Experience of SCOAP3 in Particle Physics
Publications 2018, 6(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020015
Received: 23 February 2018 / Revised: 15 March 2018 / Accepted: 3 April 2018 / Published: 9 April 2018
PDF Full-text (1047 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Gigantic particle accelerators, incredibly complex detectors, an antimatter factory and the discovery of the Higgs boson—this is part of what makes CERN famous. Only a few know that CERN also hosts the world largest Open Access initiative: SCOAP3. The Sponsoring Consortium for Open
[...] Read more.
Gigantic particle accelerators, incredibly complex detectors, an antimatter factory and the discovery of the Higgs boson—this is part of what makes CERN famous. Only a few know that CERN also hosts the world largest Open Access initiative: SCOAP3. The Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics started operation in 2014 and has since supported the publication of 20,000 Open Access articles in the field of particle physics, at no direct cost, nor burden, for individual authors worldwide. SCOAP3 is made possible by a 3000-institute strong partnership, where libraries re-direct funds previously used for subscriptions to ‘flip’ articles to ‘Gold Open Access’. With its recent expansion, the initiative now covers about 90% of the journal literature of the field. This article describes the economic principles of SCOAP3, the collaborative approach of the partnership, and finally summarizes financial results after four years of successful operation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access and the Library)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Utilisation of Library Information Resources among Generation Z Students: Facts and Fiction
Publications 2018, 6(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020016
Received: 19 March 2018 / Revised: 8 April 2018 / Accepted: 11 April 2018 / Published: 17 April 2018
PDF Full-text (532 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Generation Z was the foremost generation to have prevalent access to the Internet from an early age. Technology has strongly influenced this generation in terms of communication, education and consequently their academic information behaviour. With the next generation of scholars already being trained,
[...] Read more.
Generation Z was the foremost generation to have prevalent access to the Internet from an early age. Technology has strongly influenced this generation in terms of communication, education and consequently their academic information behaviour. With the next generation of scholars already being trained, in a decade, most of the researchers will be mainly digital natives. This study sought to establish the library information resources use pattern in relation to users’ preferred information media in order to render better academic information services to library users. A total of 390 respondents were surveyed at the Nelson Mandela University and the University of Fort Hare using quantitative and qualitative methods. Most of the respondents, 82.3%, were aged between 18 and 23 years; while the average library use time was two hours daily. The most utilised library resource is the Wi-Fi with e-books and e-journals found to be lowly utilised. Records from the E-librarians revealed that undergraduate students account for no more than 6% of total users of electronic databases with 62.3% of the respondents preferring print information resources. Better understanding of library users’ demographics and information media preference is essential in proving the right kind of information services to Generation Z library users. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Scholarly Publishing)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Supporting Open Access at Kent—New Staff Roles
Publications 2018, 6(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020017
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 9 April 2018 / Accepted: 10 April 2018 / Published: 17 April 2018
PDF Full-text (447 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Open Access has been supported at the University of Kent from an early stage with the establishment of the Kent Academic Repository in 2007. Initially, this work was accommodated within the existing library staff structure, but the pace of change, funder requirements, and
[...] Read more.
Open Access has been supported at the University of Kent from an early stage with the establishment of the Kent Academic Repository in 2007. Initially, this work was accommodated within the existing library staff structure, but the pace of change, funder requirements, and a new university plan meant that support for Open Access needed to become explicit. Therefore, a research support team was established using a matrix working system1. This article details this new structure and reflects on the benefits and challenges it brings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access and the Library)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Data-Driven Transition: Joint Reporting of Subscription Expenditure and Publication Costs
Publications 2018, 6(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020019
Received: 14 February 2018 / Revised: 28 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 April 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
PDF Full-text (327 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The transition process from the subscription model to the open access model in the world of scholarly publishing brings a variety of challenges to libraries. Within this evolving landscape, the present article takes a focus on budget control for both subscription and publication
[...] Read more.
The transition process from the subscription model to the open access model in the world of scholarly publishing brings a variety of challenges to libraries. Within this evolving landscape, the present article takes a focus on budget control for both subscription and publication expenditure with the opportunity to enable the shift from one to the other. To reach informed decisions with a solid base of data to be used in negotiations with publishers, the diverse already-existing systems for managing publications costs and for managing journal subscriptions have to be adapted to allow comprehensive reporting on publication expenditure and subscription expenditure. In the case presented here, two separate systems are described and the establishment of joint reporting covering both these systems is introduced. Some of the results of joint reporting are presented as an example of how such a comprehensive monitoring can support management decisions and negotiations. On a larger scale, the establishment of the National Open Access Monitor in Germany is introduced, bringing together a diverse range of data from several already-existing systems, including, among others, holdings information, usage data, and data on publication fees. This system will enable libraries to access all relevant data with a single user interface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access and the Library)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Enhancing Institutional Publication Data Using Emergent Open Science Services
Publications 2018, 6(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020023
Received: 5 March 2018 / Revised: 10 May 2018 / Accepted: 14 May 2018 / Published: 16 May 2018
PDF Full-text (8675 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The UK open access (OA) policy landscape simultaneously preferences Gold publishing models (Finch Report, RCUK, COAF) and Green OA through repository usage (HEFCE), creating the possibility of confusion and duplication of effort for academics and support staff. Alongside these policy developments, there has
[...] Read more.
The UK open access (OA) policy landscape simultaneously preferences Gold publishing models (Finch Report, RCUK, COAF) and Green OA through repository usage (HEFCE), creating the possibility of confusion and duplication of effort for academics and support staff. Alongside these policy developments, there has been an increase in open science services that aim to provide global data on OA. These services often exist separately to locally managed institutional systems for recording OA engagement and policy compliance. The aim of this study is to enhance Brunel University London’s local publication data using software which retrieves and processes information from the global open science services of Sherpa REF, CORE, and Unpaywall. The study draws on two classification schemes; a ‘best location’ hierarchy, which enables us to measure publishing trends and whether open access dissemination has taken place, and a relational ‘all locations’ dataset to examine whether individual publications appear across multiple OA dissemination models. Sherpa REF data is also used to indicate possible OA locations from serial policies. Our results find that there is an average of 4.767 permissible open access options available to the authors in our sample each time they publish and that Gold OA publications are replicated, on average, in 3 separate locations. A total of 40% of OA works in the sample are available in both Gold and Green locations. The study considers whether this tendency for duplication is a result of localised manual workflows which are necessarily focused on institutional compliance to meet the Research Excellence Framework 2021 requirements, and suggests that greater interoperability between OA systems and services would facilitate a more efficient transformation to open scholarship. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access and the Library)
Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Open AccessFeature PaperOpinion Publish and Who Should Perish: You or Science?
Publications 2018, 6(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020018
Received: 15 January 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 20 April 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (909 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Something is wrong with science as there is an increasing amount of unreliable, manipulated and outright faked results appearing in the literature. Here I argue that this is a direct consequence of the pay-structure and the assessment system employed in academia and it
[...] Read more.
Something is wrong with science as there is an increasing amount of unreliable, manipulated and outright faked results appearing in the literature. Here I argue that this is a direct consequence of the pay-structure and the assessment system employed in academia and it could be remedied by changing hiring, advancement, and funding criteria. Scientists are paid below average relative to their level of education, unless they are at the top or can secure grants that allow for higher salaries. Positions and grants are mostly awarded based on bibliometric numbers. Consequently, there is a strong competition to accumulate numbers of papers, impact factors, and citations. Those who can increase their value efficiently will be rewarded and the accumulation of higher values will become easier (the Matthew effect). Higher bibliometric numbers can be obtained by unethical or questionable practices, which might tempt some people. If assessments did not employ bibliometric numbers, then these practices would not have a benefit, and would fade out. Throughout the text, data from Hungary, which are similar to data from elsewhere, supplement the argument. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Scientific Ethics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCase Report Library-Mediated Deposit: A Gift to Researchers or a Curse on Open Access? Reflections from the Case of Surrey
Publications 2018, 6(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020020
Received: 20 February 2018 / Revised: 27 March 2018 / Accepted: 7 April 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
PDF Full-text (465 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The University of Surrey was one of the first universities to set up an open access repository. The Library was the natural stakeholder to lead this project. Over the years, the service has been influenced by external and internal factors, and consequently the
[...] Read more.
The University of Surrey was one of the first universities to set up an open access repository. The Library was the natural stakeholder to lead this project. Over the years, the service has been influenced by external and internal factors, and consequently the Library’s role in developing the OA agenda has changed. Here, we present the development and implementation of a fully mediated open access service at Surrey. The mediated workflow was introduced following an operational review, to ensure higher compliance and engagement from researchers. The size and responsibilities of the open access team in the Library increased to comply with internal and external policies and to implement the fully mediated workflow. As a result, there has been a growth in deposit rates and overall compliance. We discuss the benefits and shortcomings of Library mediation; its effects on the relationship between the Library, senior management and researchers, and the increasing necessity for the Library to lead towards a culture of openness beyond policy compliance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access and the Library)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessOpinion “As-You-Go” Instead of “After-the-Fact”: A Network Approach to Scholarly Communication and Evaluation
Publications 2018, 6(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6020021
Received: 28 January 2018 / Revised: 23 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 26 April 2018
PDF Full-text (783 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Scholarly research faces threats to its sustainability on multiple domains (access, incentives, reproducibility, inclusivity). We argue that “after-the-fact” research papers do not help and actually cause some of these threats because the chronology of the research cycle is lost in a research paper.
[...] Read more.
Scholarly research faces threats to its sustainability on multiple domains (access, incentives, reproducibility, inclusivity). We argue that “after-the-fact” research papers do not help and actually cause some of these threats because the chronology of the research cycle is lost in a research paper. We propose to give up the academic paper and propose a digitally native “as-you-go” alternative. In this design, modules of research outputs are communicated along the way and are directly linked to each other to form a network of outputs that can facilitate research evaluation. This embeds chronology in the design of scholarly communication and facilitates the recognition of more diverse outputs that go beyond the paper (e.g., code, materials). Moreover, using network analysis to investigate the relations between linked outputs could help align evaluation tools with evaluation questions. We illustrate how such a modular “as-you-go” design of scholarly communication could be structured and how network indicators could be computed to assist in the evaluation process, with specific use cases for funders, universities, and individual researchers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Scholarly Communication—A Vision for Tomorrow)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top