Next Issue
Previous Issue
From the start of 2016, the journal uses article numbers instead of page numbers to identify articles. If you are required to add page numbers to a citation, you can do with using a colon in the format [article number]:1–[last page], e.g. 10:1–20.

Table of Contents

Publications, Volume 4, Issue 4 (December 2016)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessEditorial …Plus la Même Chose…
Publications 2016, 4(4), 33; doi:10.3390/publications4040033
Received: 12 December 2016 / Accepted: 13 December 2016 / Published: 14 December 2016
PDF Full-text (147 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract In the last editorial (‘plus ça change’—[1]), we briefly looked at some of the major changes in scholarly communication, and how some things hadn’t changed at all.[...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Other

Open AccessArticle Research Articles about Open Access Indexed by Scopus: A Content Analysis
Publications 2016, 4(4), 31; doi:10.3390/publications4040031
Received: 31 May 2016 / Revised: 19 August 2016 / Accepted: 22 September 2016 / Published: 11 October 2016
PDF Full-text (493 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study analyzes research articles about open access (OA) indexed by the Scopus database, published from 2001 to 2015, in order to: (a) propose a categorization scheme about OA; (b) categorize the scientific production about OA; and (c) identify research trends on OA
[...] Read more.
This study analyzes research articles about open access (OA) indexed by the Scopus database, published from 2001 to 2015, in order to: (a) propose a categorization scheme about OA; (b) categorize the scientific production about OA; and (c) identify research trends on OA through disciplines at international level over time. The authors used descriptive statistical methods and deductive content analysis using an unconstrained matrix in 347 selected research articles. The most explored themes were found to be “overview, current state, and growth of OA” counting for 98 articles (28.2%), and “awareness, perceptions, and attitudes toward OA” for 75 articles (21.6%). As a conclusion, this study reveals a continuous and growing research interest by the OA community in studies focused on case studies regarding the development or evolution of OA in relation to certain groups, institutions, regions, periods, and how different actors perceive and address the OA movement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Operational Issues in Open Access)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Think of It as a Trailer… for a Book
Publications 2016, 4(4), 32; doi:10.3390/publications4040032
Received: 19 April 2016 / Revised: 12 October 2016 / Accepted: 18 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
PDF Full-text (202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The seemingly overnight emergence of a form of promotion known as ‘book trailers’ shortly after the turn of the millennium suggests a shift in the marketing and promotional strategies employed within the publishing industry. This article follows the historical development of the audio-visual
[...] Read more.
The seemingly overnight emergence of a form of promotion known as ‘book trailers’ shortly after the turn of the millennium suggests a shift in the marketing and promotional strategies employed within the publishing industry. This article follows the historical development of the audio-visual form known as the ‘book trailer’ across its history with a view to understanding the form itself. This article uses third party mediation to identify ‘book trailers’ within the public domain, grounding this work within a broader media and literary history. As such, this article charts the use of the term ‘book trailer’ and its competing nomenclature through newspaper archives and contextualises this with antecedent practices, and integrating this with the current literature on the film trailer as part of a wider understanding of the promotional trailer as a cultural entity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Publishing - Transformations)

Other

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Open AccessEssay Open Access in Context: Connecting Authors, Publications and Workflows Using ORCID Identifiers
Publications 2016, 4(4), 30; doi:10.3390/publications4040030
Received: 1 April 2016 / Revised: 29 June 2016 / Accepted: 2 September 2016 / Published: 26 September 2016
PDF Full-text (182 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As scholarly communications became digital, Open Access and, more broadly, open research, emerged among the most exciting possibilities of the academic Web. However, these possibilities have been constrained by phenomena carried over from the print age. Information resources dwell in discrete silos. It
[...] Read more.
As scholarly communications became digital, Open Access and, more broadly, open research, emerged among the most exciting possibilities of the academic Web. However, these possibilities have been constrained by phenomena carried over from the print age. Information resources dwell in discrete silos. It is difficult to connect authors and others unambiguously to specific outputs, despite advances in algorithmic matching. Connecting funding information, datasets, and other essential research information to individuals and their work is still done manually at great expense in time and effort. Given that one of the greatest benefits of the modern web is the rich array of links between digital objects and related resources that it enables, this is a significant failure. The ability to connect, discover, and access resources is the underpinning premise of open research, so tools to enable this, themselves open, are vital. The increasing adoption of resolvable, persistent identifiers for people, digital objects, and research information offers a means of providing these missing connections. This article describes some of the ways that identifiers can help to unlock the potential of open research, focusing on the Open Researcher and Contributor Identifier (ORCID), a person identifier that also serves to link other identifiers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Operational Issues in Open Access)
Open AccessOpinion A Middle-of-the-Road Proposal amid the Sci-Hub Controversy: Share “Unofficial” Copies of Articles without Embargo, Legally
Publications 2016, 4(4), 29; doi:10.3390/publications4040029
Received: 17 August 2016 / Revised: 19 September 2016 / Accepted: 19 September 2016 / Published: 23 September 2016
PDF Full-text (162 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract This article summarizes the two sides of the Sci-Hub debate, and raises awareness of the rights of journal article authors to post a certain version online that one is legally allowed to share, with no embargo. Full article

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Publications Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Publications Edit a special issue Review for Publications
Back to Top