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Publications, Volume 1, Issue 2 (September 2013), Pages 49-86

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Research

Open AccessCommunication The Importance of Free and Open Source Software and Open Standards in Modern Scientific Publishing
Publications 2013, 1(2), 49-55; doi:10.3390/publications1020049
Received: 12 April 2013 / Revised: 7 June 2013 / Accepted: 19 June 2013 / Published: 26 June 2013
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Abstract
In this paper we outline the reasons why we believe a reliance on the use of proprietary computer software and proprietary file formats in scientific publication have negative implications for the conduct and reporting of science. There is increasing awareness and interest [...] Read more.
In this paper we outline the reasons why we believe a reliance on the use of proprietary computer software and proprietary file formats in scientific publication have negative implications for the conduct and reporting of science. There is increasing awareness and interest in the scientific community about the benefits offered by free and open source software. We discuss the present state of scientific publishing and the merits of advocating for a wider adoption of open standards in science, particularly where it concerns the publishing process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access - A Review after 10 Years)
Open AccessArticle Open Access and the Changing Landscape of Research Impact Indicators: New Roles for Repositories
Publications 2013, 1(2), 56-77; doi:10.3390/publications1020056
Received: 6 May 2013 / Revised: 2 July 2013 / Accepted: 10 July 2013 / Published: 19 July 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3486 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The debate about the need to revise metrics that evaluate research excellence has been ongoing for years, and a number of studies have identified important issues that have yet to be addressed. Internet and other technological developments have enabled the collection of [...] Read more.
The debate about the need to revise metrics that evaluate research excellence has been ongoing for years, and a number of studies have identified important issues that have yet to be addressed. Internet and other technological developments have enabled the collection of richer data and new approaches to research assessment exercises. Open access strongly advocates for maximizing research impact by enhancing seamless accessibility. In addition, new tools and strategies have been used by open access journals and repositories to showcase how science can benefit from free online dissemination. Latest players in the debate include initiatives based on alt-metrics, which enrich the landscape with promising indicators. To start with, the article gives a brief overview of the debate and the role of open access in advancing a new frame to assess science. Next, the work focuses on the strategy that the Spanish National Research Council’s repository DIGITAL.CSIC is implementing to collect a rich set of statistics and other metrics that are useful for repository administrators, researchers and the institution alike. A preliminary analysis of data hints at correlations between free dissemination of research through DIGITAL.CSIC and enhanced impact, reusability and sharing of CSIC science on the web. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access - A Review after 10 Years)
Open AccessArticle The Normalization of Citation Counts Based on Classification Systems
Publications 2013, 1(2), 78-86; doi:10.3390/publications1020078
Received: 20 June 2013 / Revised: 19 July 2013 / Accepted: 28 July 2013 / Published: 2 August 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (173 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
If we want to assess whether the paper in question has had a particularly high or low citation impact compared to other papers, the standard practice in bibliometrics is to normalize citations in respect of the subject category and publication year. A [...] Read more.
If we want to assess whether the paper in question has had a particularly high or low citation impact compared to other papers, the standard practice in bibliometrics is to normalize citations in respect of the subject category and publication year. A number of proposals for an improved procedure in the normalization of citation impact have been put forward in recent years. Against the background of these proposals, this study describes an ideal solution for the normalization of citation impact: in a first step, the reference set for the publication in question is collated by means of a classification scheme, where every publication is associated with a single principal research field or subfield entry (e.g., via Chemical Abstracts sections) and a publication year. In a second step, percentiles of citation counts are calculated for this set and used to assign the normalized citation impact score to the publications (and also to the publication in question). Full article

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