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Dent. J. 2016, 4(3), 29; doi:10.3390/dj4030029

Imaging in Patients with Bisphosphonate-Associated Osteonecrosis of the Jaws (MRONJ)

1
Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Basel, 4056 Basel, Switzerland
2
Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
3
Clinic of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau, 5001 Aarau, Switzerland
4
Private Practice, 25524 Itzehoe, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Christian Walter
Received: 19 July 2016 / Revised: 11 August 2016 / Accepted: 17 August 2016 / Published: 2 September 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Cancer and Osteoporosis Therapies and Osteocrosis of the Jaws)
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Abstract

Background: Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ/BP-ONJ/BRONJ) is a commonly seen disease. During recent decades, major advances in diagnostics have occurred. Once the clinical picture shows typical MRONJ features, imaging is necessary to determine the size of the lesion. Exposed bone is not always painful, therefore a thorough clinical examination and radiological imaging are essential when MRONJ is suspected. Methods: In this paper we will present the latest clinical update on the imaging options in regard to MRONJ: X-ray/Panoramic Radiograph, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Nuclear Imaging, Fluorescence-Guided Bone Resection. Conclusion: Which image modality is chosen depends not only on the surgeon’s/practitioner’s preference but also on the available imaging modalities. A three-dimensional imaging modality is desirable, and in severe cases necessary, for extended resections and planning of reconstruction. View Full-Text
Keywords: bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis; magnetic resonance imaging; panoramic radiograph; computed tomography; cone beam computed tomography; single photon emission computed tomography; positron emission tomography; fluorescence-guided bone resection bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis; magnetic resonance imaging; panoramic radiograph; computed tomography; cone beam computed tomography; single photon emission computed tomography; positron emission tomography; fluorescence-guided bone resection
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Berg, B.-I.; Mueller, A.A.; Augello, M.; Berg, S.; Jaquiéry, C. Imaging in Patients with Bisphosphonate-Associated Osteonecrosis of the Jaws (MRONJ). Dent. J. 2016, 4, 29.

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Dent. J. EISSN 2304-6767 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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