Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Inorganics, Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2014), Pages 1-154

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-7
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Bottom-Up, Wet Chemical Technique for the Continuous Synthesis of Inorganic Nanoparticles
Inorganics 2014, 2(1), 1-15; doi:10.3390/inorganics2010001
Received: 20 December 2013 / Revised: 14 January 2014 / Accepted: 16 January 2014 / Published: 27 January 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1033 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Continuous wet chemical approaches for the production of inorganic nanoparticles are important for large scale production of nanoparticles. Here we describe a bottom-up, wet chemical method applying a microjet reactor. This technique allows the separation between nucleation and growth in a continuous reactor
[...] Read more.
Continuous wet chemical approaches for the production of inorganic nanoparticles are important for large scale production of nanoparticles. Here we describe a bottom-up, wet chemical method applying a microjet reactor. This technique allows the separation between nucleation and growth in a continuous reactor environment. Zinc oxide (ZnO), magnetite (Fe3O4), as well as brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O), particles with a small particle size distribution can be obtained continuously by using the rapid mixing of two precursor solutions and the fast removal of the nuclei from the reaction environment. The final particles were characterized by FT-IR, TGA, DLS, XRD and SEM techniques. Systematic studies on the influence of the different process parameters, such as flow rate and process temperature, show that the particle size can be influenced. Zinc oxide was obtained with particle sizes between 44 nm and 102 nm. The obtained magnetite particles have particle sizes in the range of 46 nm to 132 nm. Brushite behaves differently; the obtained particles were shaped like small plates with edge lengths between 100 nm and 500 nm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Inorganic Synthesis) Print Edition available
Open AccessArticle Investigation into the Incorporation of Phosphate into BaCe1−yAyO3−y/2 (A = Y, Yb, In)
Inorganics 2014, 2(1), 16-28; doi:10.3390/inorganics2010016
Received: 26 November 2013 / Revised: 23 January 2014 / Accepted: 24 January 2014 / Published: 29 January 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (835 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper we examine the effect of doping phosphate into BaCe1−yAyO3−y/2 (A = Y, Yb, In). The samples were analysed through a combination of X-ray diffraction, TGA, Raman spectroscopy and conductivity measurements. The results
[...] Read more.
In this paper we examine the effect of doping phosphate into BaCe1−yAyO3−y/2 (A = Y, Yb, In). The samples were analysed through a combination of X-ray diffraction, TGA, Raman spectroscopy and conductivity measurements. The results showed that phosphate could be incorporated into this system up to the 10% doping level, although this required an increased Y/Yb/In content, e.g., BaCe0.6(Y/In/Yb)0.3P0.1O2.9. The phosphate doping was, however, shown to lead to a decrease in conductivity; although at low phosphate levels high conductivities were still observed, e.g., for BaCe0.65Y0.3P0.05O2.875, σ = 4.3 × 10−3 S cm−1 at 600 °C in wet N2. In terms of the effect of phosphate incorporation on the CO2 stability, it was shown to lead to a small improvement for the In containing samples, whereas the yttrium doped compositions showed no change in CO2 stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Storage and Conversion)
Open AccessArticle New Type-I and Type-II Clathrates in the Systems Cs–Na–Ga–Si, Rb–Na–Ga–Si, and Rb–Na–Zn–Si
Inorganics 2014, 2(1), 79-95; doi:10.3390/inorganics2010079
Received: 14 January 2014 / Revised: 25 February 2014 / Accepted: 28 February 2014 / Published: 18 March 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1357 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Systematic studies in the systems Cs–Na–Ga–Si, Rb–Na–Ga–Si, and Rb–Na–Zn–Si yielded the novel type-I clathrates with refined compositions Cs6Na2Ga8.25Si37.75(3), Rb6.34Na1.66(2)Ga8.02Si37.98(3), and Rb5.20Na2.80(4)Zn3.85Si
[...] Read more.
Systematic studies in the systems Cs–Na–Ga–Si, Rb–Na–Ga–Si, and Rb–Na–Zn–Si yielded the novel type-I clathrates with refined compositions Cs6Na2Ga8.25Si37.75(3), Rb6.34Na1.66(2)Ga8.02Si37.98(3), and Rb5.20Na2.80(4)Zn3.85Si42.15(2) (cubic, ), as well as the type-II clathrates with formulae Cs8Na16Ga22.7Si113.3(1), Rb8.4Na15.6(1)Ga19.6Si116.4(1), and Rb8Na16Zn8.4Si127.6(1) (cubic, ). In each system, the type-I and -II compounds are always co-crystallizing, irrespective of the reaction conditions. The structures derived from single-crystal X-ray diffraction confirm complete ordering of Cs and Na atoms, and nearly complete ordering of the Rb and Na guest atoms. The framework-building Si atoms are randomly substituted by Ga or Zn atoms on all framework sites with notable difference in the substitution patterns between the type-I and type-II structure. This, and other details of the crystal chemistry are discussed in this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Storage and Conversion)
Open AccessArticle Comparative Issues of Cathode Materials for Li-Ion Batteries
Inorganics 2014, 2(1), 132-154; doi:10.3390/inorganics2010132
Received: 29 January 2014 / Revised: 10 March 2014 / Accepted: 12 March 2014 / Published: 25 March 2014
Cited by 44 | PDF Full-text (681 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
After an introduction to lithium insertion compounds and the principles of Li-ion cells, we present a comparative study of the physical and electrochemical properties of positive electrodes used in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Electrode materials include three different classes of lattices according to the
[...] Read more.
After an introduction to lithium insertion compounds and the principles of Li-ion cells, we present a comparative study of the physical and electrochemical properties of positive electrodes used in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Electrode materials include three different classes of lattices according to the dimensionality of the Li+ ion motion in them: olivine, layered transition-metal oxides and spinel frameworks. Their advantages and disadvantages are compared with emphasis on synthesis difficulties, electrochemical stability, faradaic performance and security issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Storage and Conversion)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Chemistry of Ammonothermal Synthesis
Inorganics 2014, 2(1), 29-78; doi:10.3390/inorganics2010029
Received: 10 December 2013 / Revised: 21 January 2014 / Accepted: 27 January 2014 / Published: 28 February 2014
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (1825 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Ammonothermal synthesis is a method for synthesis and crystal growth suitable for a large range of chemically different materials, such as nitrides (e.g., GaN, AlN), amides (e.g., LiNH2, Zn(NH2)2), imides (e.g., Th(NH)2), ammoniates (e.g., Ga(NH
[...] Read more.
Ammonothermal synthesis is a method for synthesis and crystal growth suitable for a large range of chemically different materials, such as nitrides (e.g., GaN, AlN), amides (e.g., LiNH2, Zn(NH2)2), imides (e.g., Th(NH)2), ammoniates (e.g., Ga(NH3)3F3, [Al(NH3)6]I3 · NH3) and non-nitrogen compounds like hydroxides, hydrogen sulfides and polychalcogenides (e.g., NaOH, LiHS, CaS, Cs2Te5). In particular, large scale production of high quality crystals is possible, due to comparatively simple scalability of the experimental set-up. The ammonothermal method is defined as employing a heterogeneous reaction in ammonia as one homogenous fluid close to or in supercritical state. Three types of milieus may be applied during ammonothermal synthesis: ammonobasic, ammononeutral or ammonoacidic, evoked by the used starting materials and mineralizers, strongly influencing the obtained products. There is little known about the dissolution and materials transport processes or the deposition mechanisms during ammonothermal crystal growth. However, the initial results indicate the possible nature of different intermediate species present in the respective milieus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Inorganic Synthesis) Print Edition available
Open AccessReview Syntheses of Macromolecular Ruthenium Compounds: A New Approach for the Search of Anticancer Drugs
Inorganics 2014, 2(1), 96-114; doi:10.3390/inorganics2010096
Received: 7 January 2014 / Revised: 20 February 2014 / Accepted: 27 February 2014 / Published: 21 March 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (580 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The continuous rising of the cancer patient death rate undoubtedly shows the pressure to find more potent and efficient drugs than those in clinical use. These agents only treat a narrow range of cancer conditions with limited success and are associated with serious
[...] Read more.
The continuous rising of the cancer patient death rate undoubtedly shows the pressure to find more potent and efficient drugs than those in clinical use. These agents only treat a narrow range of cancer conditions with limited success and are associated with serious side effects caused by the lack of selectivity. In this frame, innovative syntheses approaches can decisively contribute to the success of “smart compounds” that might be only selective and/or active towards the cancer cells, sparing the healthy ones. In this scope, ruthenium chemistry is a rising field for the search of proficient metallodrugs by the use of macromolecular ruthenium complexes (dendrimers and dendronized polymers, coordination-cage and protein conjugates, nanoparticles and polymer-“ruthenium-cyclopentadienyl” conjugates) that can take advantage of the singularities of tumor cells (vs. healthy cells). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Inorganic Synthesis) Print Edition available
Open AccessReview Diarylplatinum(II) Compounds as Versatile Metallating Agents in the Synthesis of Cyclometallated Platinum Compounds with N-Donor Ligands
Inorganics 2014, 2(1), 115-131; doi:10.3390/inorganics2010115
Received: 14 February 2014 / Revised: 13 March 2014 / Accepted: 13 March 2014 / Published: 21 March 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (631 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This review deals with the reactions of diarylplatinum(II) complexes with N-donor ligands to produce a variety of cycloplatinated compounds including endo-five-, endo-seven-, endo-six- or exo-five-membered platinacycles. The observed reactions result from a series of oxidative addition/reductive elimination processes
[...] Read more.
This review deals with the reactions of diarylplatinum(II) complexes with N-donor ligands to produce a variety of cycloplatinated compounds including endo-five-, endo-seven-, endo-six- or exo-five-membered platinacycles. The observed reactions result from a series of oxidative addition/reductive elimination processes taking place at platinum(II)/platinum(IV) species and involving C–X (X = H, Cl, Br) bond activation, arene elimination, and, in some cases, Caryl–Caryl bond formation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organoplatinum Complexes)
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Inorganics Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
inorganics@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Inorganics
Back to Top