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Chromatography, Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2014), Pages 1-54

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Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessEditorial Chromatography is Alive and Well
Chromatography 2014, 1(1), 54; doi:10.3390/chromatography1010054
Received: 14 February 2014 / Accepted: 14 February 2014 / Published: 25 February 2014
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Abstract
It is my great pleasure to serve as the first editor-in-chief for Chromatography, and welcome you all to the readership. This journal will enable us to communicate our findings in “open access” while maintaining the very high scientific requirements of the [...] Read more.
It is my great pleasure to serve as the first editor-in-chief for Chromatography, and welcome you all to the readership. This journal will enable us to communicate our findings in “open access” while maintaining the very high scientific requirements of the few other journals that are focused on the type of science that we all find so very interesting. It is safe to say that chromatographic separations are the single most heavily used techniques in the larger field of analytical chemistry, whether applied or fundamental. Without chromatography, we would struggle to answer many of the pressing scientific questions of our time, and without improvements and advancements we will still struggle to probe more deeply into the challenges of the future. Whether it is for better understanding and characterization of starting materials and products, qualitative determination of unknowns in important matrices, quantification of the materials that impact our lives, or the discovery of the emerging compounds of the future, chromatography is the science that ties our various research fields together. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle Oroxylum indicum Seeds—Analysis of Flavonoids by Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography
Chromatography 2014, 1(1), 1-8; doi:10.3390/chromatography1010001
Received: 5 January 2013 / Revised: 16 February 2013 / Accepted: 19 February 2013 / Published: 25 February 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (315 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Flavonoids are bioactive constituents in Oroxylum indicum seeds, an Asian traditional remedy used for the treatment of respiratory infections. In this study the first capillary electrophoretic method for their determination is presented. By using a 25 mM borax buffer at pH 9.2 [...] Read more.
Flavonoids are bioactive constituents in Oroxylum indicum seeds, an Asian traditional remedy used for the treatment of respiratory infections. In this study the first capillary electrophoretic method for their determination is presented. By using a 25 mM borax buffer at pH 9.2 containing 10 mM SDS as detergent, the determination of seven flavonoids was feasible in only 13 min. Method validation confirmed that the assay is in accordance with ICH requirements in respect to linearity, selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy and precision. Quantitative results revealed that baicalein-7-O-gentiobioside is the most abundant flavonoid in the drug (1.19 to 5.33%), followed by other baicalein derivatives (7-O-glucoside, 7-O-glucuronide). These observations were in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with LC-MS results. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography with Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection for Separation of Red and Yellow Historical Dyes
Chromatography 2014, 1(1), 9-23; doi:10.3390/chromatography1010009
Received: 17 February 2013 / Accepted: 12 March 2013 / Published: 27 March 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (611 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, the separation parameters in micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC)-laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were optimized for the separation of red and yellow historical dyes in 20 mM borate buffer with 20 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Separation conditions were optimized by changing [...] Read more.
In this study, the separation parameters in micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC)-laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were optimized for the separation of red and yellow historical dyes in 20 mM borate buffer with 20 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Separation conditions were optimized by changing pH, organic modifier (methanol and acetonitrile) concentrations and applied voltage. The mixtures of dyes used in this study included four anthraquinone dyes (alizarin, purpurin, emodin and carmine) and six flavonoid dyes (luteolin, apigenin, kaempferol, quercetin, morin and myricetin). For this work, dyes were introduced electro-kinetically (10 kV for 5 s) into a 50 cm capillary (10 µm id) and separated using a running potential of 18, 20, 22 and 25 kV. Absolute limits of detection for most of these dyes was less than 1 pg. For dyes such as alizarin, improved detection limits were achieved at pH = 9.24; however dyes such as purpurin had significantly improved detection limits at pH = 8.0. The successful extraction and identification of a number of dyes in plants and textiles samples is also described. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview Post-Polymerization Modifications of Polymeric Monolithic Columns: A Review
Chromatography 2014, 1(1), 24-53; doi:10.3390/chromatography1010024
Received: 18 December 2013 / Revised: 16 January 2014 / Accepted: 17 January 2014 / Published: 10 February 2014
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (780 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The vast cache of methods used in polymeric monolithic column modification is presented herein, with specific attention to post-polymerization modification reactions. The modification of polymeric monolithic columns is defined and can include the modification of pre-existing surface groups, the addition of polymeric [...] Read more.
The vast cache of methods used in polymeric monolithic column modification is presented herein, with specific attention to post-polymerization modification reactions. The modification of polymeric monolithic columns is defined and can include the modification of pre-existing surface groups, the addition of polymeric chains or indeed the addition of structures such as nano-particles and nano-structures. The use of these modifications can result in the specific patterning of monoliths, useful in microfluidic device design or in the investigation of modification optimization. Full article
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