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Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 18; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020018

Disability and Psychiatric Symptoms in Men Referred for Treatment with Work-Related Problems to Primary Mental Health Care

1
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada
2
St. Joseph’s Care Group, 710 Victoria Avenue East, Thunder Bay, ON P7C 5P7, Canada
3
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sampath Parthasarathy
Received: 17 November 2016 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 24 March 2017
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Abstract

The relationship between male sex and employment as barriers to accessing mental health care is unclear. The aim of this research was to examine (1) whether the clinical features of men referred to a shared mental health care (SMHC) service through primary care differed when symptoms were affecting them in the work domain; and (2) empirically re-evaluate the effectiveness of a SMHC model for work-related disability using a pre-post chart review of N = 3960 referrals to SMHC. ANOVA and logistic regression were performed to examine symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ) and disability (World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule, WHODAS 2) at entry and discharge. Men were RR (relative risk) = 1.8 (95% C.I.: 1.60–2.05) times more likely to be referred to SMHC with work problems than women. Having greater disability and more severe somatic symptoms increased the likelihood of a work-related referral. There were no significant differences after treatment. Problems in the work domain may play an important role in men’s treatment seeking and clinicians’ recognition of a mental health care need. This study is relevant because men are underrepresented in mental health (MH) treatment and primary care is the main gateway to accessing MH care. Asking men about functioning in the work domain may increase access to helpful psychiatric services. View Full-Text
Keywords: collaborative care; men; outpatient; PHQ; WHODAS 2; work; mental health; primary care collaborative care; men; outpatient; PHQ; WHODAS 2; work; mental health; primary care
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Bailey, S.K.; Mushquash, C.J.; Haggarty, J.M. Disability and Psychiatric Symptoms in Men Referred for Treatment with Work-Related Problems to Primary Mental Health Care. Healthcare 2017, 5, 18.

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