Next Article in Journal
Getting “Unstuck”: A Multi-Site Evaluation of the Efficacy of an Interdisciplinary Pain Intervention Program for Chronic Low Back Pain
Next Article in Special Issue
Review of Positive Psychology Applications in Clinical Medical Populations
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
StopApp: Using the Behaviour Change Wheel to Develop an App to Increase Uptake and Attendance at NHS Stop Smoking Services
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Healthcare 2016, 4(2), 32; doi:10.3390/healthcare4020032

The Impact of Antenatal Psychological Group Interventions on Psychological Well-Being: A Systematic Review of the Qualitative and Quantitative Evidence

Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Helen Pattison
Received: 27 February 2016 / Revised: 13 May 2016 / Accepted: 27 May 2016 / Published: 8 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Psychology in Healthcare Settings)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [597 KB, uploaded 8 June 2016]   |  

Abstract

Depression, anxiety and stress in the perinatal period can have serious, long-term consequences for women, their babies and their families. Over the last two decades, an increasing number of group interventions with a psychological approach have been developed to improve the psychological well-being of pregnant women. This systematic review examines interventions targeting women with elevated symptoms of, or at risk of developing, perinatal mental health problems, with the aim of understanding the successful and unsuccessful features of these interventions. We systematically searched online databases to retrieve qualitative and quantitative studies on psychological antenatal group interventions. A total number of 19 papers describing 15 studies were identified; these included interventions based on cognitive behavioural therapy, interpersonal therapy and mindfulness. Quantitative findings suggested beneficial effects in some studies, particularly for women with high baseline symptoms. However, overall there is insufficient quantitative evidence to make a general recommendation for antenatal group interventions. Qualitative findings suggest that women and their partners experience these interventions positively in terms of psychological wellbeing and providing reassurance of their ‘normality’. This review suggests that there are some benefits to attending group interventions, but further research is required to fully understand their successful and unsuccessful features. View Full-Text
Keywords: perinatal mental health; antenatal intervention; antenatal depression; postnatal depression; antenatal anxiety; antenatal stress; systematic review perinatal mental health; antenatal intervention; antenatal depression; postnatal depression; antenatal anxiety; antenatal stress; systematic review
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Wadephul, F.; Jones, C.; Jomeen, J. The Impact of Antenatal Psychological Group Interventions on Psychological Well-Being: A Systematic Review of the Qualitative and Quantitative Evidence. Healthcare 2016, 4, 32.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Healthcare EISSN 2227-9032 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top