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Educ. Sci., Volume 3, Issue 1 (March 2013), Pages 1-74

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Open AccessArticle Ten Years’ Experience with an E-Learning Lecture Series on Cancer Biology and Pharmacology
Educ. Sci. 2013, 3(1), 1-16; doi:10.3390/educsci3010001
Received: 10 October 2012 / Revised: 8 December 2012 / Accepted: 8 January 2013 / Published: 14 January 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (708 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In life sciences, the internet is an indispensable medium for research, but has not yet realized its full potential for teaching. The concept of e-learning has been developed over the past decades for undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate programs. We set up an e-learning
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In life sciences, the internet is an indispensable medium for research, but has not yet realized its full potential for teaching. The concept of e-learning has been developed over the past decades for undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate programs. We set up an e-learning lecture on cancer biology and pharmacology that was first offered in 2003 to students of Molecular Biotechnology at the University of Heidelberg and to students of Pharmacy at the University of Mainz, Germany. The present paper recapitulates the first decade of experiences with this e-learning lecture from both the students’ and the teachers’ perspectives. A total of 317 students during the past 10 years participated in a survey. In general, the students enjoyed the possibilities that self-controlled learning offers. E-learning interested them as a novel educational method. They felt quite comfortable listening to the material despite the interdisciplinary nature of the lectures, which included molecular biological, pharmacological and medical aspects of cancer biology and pharmacology. This lecture was the first e-learning experience for the majority of students, and their impressions were generally positive. The students not only indicated that they would like to continue with e-learning, but also would recommend e-learning to other students. Remarkably, the majority of students would like to see more e-learning offered in their present curricula. They indicated interest in mixed forms of traditional learning and e-learning (“blended learning”), although it is recognized that face-to-face contact between teachers and students is critical. Overall, many students would consider e-learning for further and continuing education after graduation. Full article
Open AccessArticle Curriculum Designed for an Equitable Pedagogy
Educ. Sci. 2013, 3(1), 17-29; doi:10.3390/educsci3010017
Received: 12 November 2012 / Revised: 23 January 2013 / Accepted: 25 January 2013 / Published: 1 February 2013
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Abstract
Rather than viewing curriculum as linear, a post-modern, learner-centered curriculum design is a spiral or recursive curriculum. Post-modernism provides a much less stable foundation upon which to build a model of student learning, a model that recognizes and even celebrates individual difference and
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Rather than viewing curriculum as linear, a post-modern, learner-centered curriculum design is a spiral or recursive curriculum. Post-modernism provides a much less stable foundation upon which to build a model of student learning, a model that recognizes and even celebrates individual difference and one that is supported by research on how people learn. We propose one such curricular approach through an examination of a Bachelor of Integrative Studies program. Full article
Open AccessArticle Who Needs to Fit in? Who Gets to Stand out? Communication Technologies Including Brain-Machine Interfaces Revealed from the Perspectives of Special Education School Teachers Through an Ableism Lens
Educ. Sci. 2013, 3(1), 30-49; doi:10.3390/educsci3010030
Received: 19 December 2012 / Revised: 29 January 2013 / Accepted: 31 January 2013 / Published: 5 February 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (219 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Some new and envisioned technologies such as brain machine interfaces (BMI) that are being developed initially for people with disabilities, but whose use can also be expanded to the general public have the potential to change body ability expectations of disabled and non-disabled
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Some new and envisioned technologies such as brain machine interfaces (BMI) that are being developed initially for people with disabilities, but whose use can also be expanded to the general public have the potential to change body ability expectations of disabled and non-disabled people beyond the species-typical. The ways in which this dynamic will impact students with disabilities in the domain of special education is explored. Data was drawn from six special education school teachers from one school in Calgary, Alberta. Five sub-themes (social acceptance, not adding to the impairment, fear of judgement by society, pursuing “normality” and meeting the demands of society) were identified that fit under the main identified theme of “fitting in by not standing out”. Findings demonstrate a dichotomy in participant views of non- or socially acceptable communication devices. The perception of BMI technology was also explored among special education school teachers, revealing benefits and challenges with the uptake of this technology for students with disabilities. Perceptions of people with disabilities and ableism are presented as conceptual frameworks to interpret the influence and impact of the findings. Full article
Open AccessArticle Treading Old Paths in New Ways: Upper Secondary Students Using a Digital Tool of the Professional Historian
Educ. Sci. 2013, 3(1), 50-73; doi:10.3390/educsci3010050
Received: 10 January 2013 / Revised: 8 February 2013 / Accepted: 25 February 2013 / Published: 11 March 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (613 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article presents problems and possibilities associated with incorporating into history teaching a digital demographic database made for professional historians. We detect and discuss the outcome of how students in Swedish upper secondary schools respond to a teaching approach involving digitized registers comprising
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This article presents problems and possibilities associated with incorporating into history teaching a digital demographic database made for professional historians. We detect and discuss the outcome of how students in Swedish upper secondary schools respond to a teaching approach involving digitized registers comprising 19th century individuals and populations. Even though our results demonstrate that students experience the use of this digital database as messy, stressful, complicated, even meaningless and frustrating, they also perceive working with it as most interesting. We discuss this twofold outcome, its reasons and lessons to learn from it.  When technology is functioning and the task is specialized and sufficiently guided by the teacher, which is not always the case, our results propose that digital databases can stimulate young people’s interest and historical thinking. Knowledge construction based upon historical thinking is evident in the students’ examination papers in which they present and debate their findings. These papers indicate that students can use a digital database and write history based upon empirical evidence, source criticism and historical empathy, just as professional historians do. Full article

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Open AccessCorrection Correction: Kate Hawkey, History and Super Diversity. Education Sciences 2012, 2, 165-179
Educ. Sci. 2013, 3(1), 74; doi:10.3390/educsci3010074
Received: 13 March 2013 / Accepted: 19 March 2013 / Published: 21 March 2013
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Abstract In the article detailed above figure 1 on page 174 in [1] is incorrect. [...] Full article

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