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Educ. Sci., Volume 2, Issue 2 (June 2012), Pages 54-120

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial History Curriculum, Geschichtsdidaktik, and the Problem of the Nation
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(2), 54-55; doi:10.3390/educ2020054
Received: 16 March 2012 / Accepted: 20 March 2012 / Published: 23 March 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (115 KB) | XML Full-text
Abstract
The field of curriculum studies has become increasingly sensitive to the “effects of global flows, transnational connections, and transcultural interactions” ([1], p. 43), and an international dialogue has begun to take shape between the European bildung-influenced tradition of Didaktiks and the [...] Read more.
The field of curriculum studies has become increasingly sensitive to the “effects of global flows, transnational connections, and transcultural interactions” ([1], p. 43), and an international dialogue has begun to take shape between the European bildung-influenced tradition of Didaktiks and the Anglo-American psychologised Curriculum Studies tradition. As it stands, the dialogue has concentrated on a comparative analysis of the traditions at the level of general curriculum theory or Allgemeine Didaktik (see for example, [2]), and has rarely, if ever, drilled down into an area of subject-specific pedagogy or fachdidaktiks. This special issue seeks to address this directly, by encouraging a dialogue between various regional and national traditions of history education or Geschichtsdidaktik. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue History Curriculum, Geschichtsdidaktik, and the Problem of the Nation)
Open AccessEditorial Publisher’s Note: Education to Education Sciences
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(2), 56; doi:10.3390/educsci2020056
Received: 24 April 2012 / Published: 16 May 2012
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Abstract
After launching the journal Education (Basel) we became aware that this title has been used by another publisher as a printed journal. Since only seven papers have been published so far, we decided to change the journal title to Education Sciences and [...] Read more.
After launching the journal Education (Basel) we became aware that this title has been used by another publisher as a printed journal. Since only seven papers have been published so far, we decided to change the journal title to Education Sciences and move the seven published papers to Education Sciences. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Investigating Student Use of Technology for Engaged Citizenship in A Global Age
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(2), 57-76; doi:10.3390/educsci2020057
Received: 1 February 2012 / Revised: 28 March 2012 / Accepted: 29 March 2012 / Published: 18 May 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (216 KB) | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study undertook a five month qualitative investigation into technology use amongst twelve high school social studies students in two different sites in the Midwestern United States. This study examined students’ use of technology and its relationship to three dimensions of citizenship [...] Read more.
This study undertook a five month qualitative investigation into technology use amongst twelve high school social studies students in two different sites in the Midwestern United States. This study examined students’ use of technology and its relationship to three dimensions of citizenship in a global age: understand global events, issues, and perspectives, participate in global networks to communicate and collaborate with global audiences, and advocate on global problems and issues to think and act globally. Collecting data through semi-structured student interviews, online-threaded discussions and document analysis, I triangulated findings, and employed a qualitative approach. The study finds a relationship between student participants’ use of technology and their serving as engaged citizenship in a global age. In using technology, students accessed international news and information, joined global networks to communicate and collaborate with global audiences, and produced digital content for international audiences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civics and Citizenship in Its Global Context)
Open AccessArticle Engaging Secondary School Students in Food-Related Citizenship: Achievements and Challenges of A Multi-Component Programme
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(2), 77-90; doi:10.3390/educsci2020077
Received: 1 March 2012 / Revised: 16 April 2012 / Accepted: 16 April 2012 / Published: 21 May 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (320 KB) | XML Full-text
Abstract
Global food security and sustainability, animal welfare, dietary health, and socially just relations of food production have become prominent societal issues. They are of particular concern for young people as their lives progress towards becoming independent consumers and citizens with the capacity [...] Read more.
Global food security and sustainability, animal welfare, dietary health, and socially just relations of food production have become prominent societal issues. They are of particular concern for young people as their lives progress towards becoming independent consumers and citizens with the capacity to shape food systems of the future. This paper examined the role of the Food for Life Partnership programme in promoting young people’s engagement with food-related citizenship education in secondary schools. The research consisted of a two stage study of 24 English schools. We surveyed experiences and attitudes of students and staff, and recorded programme activities. The results presented a mixed picture. Staff reports and monitoring evidence showed much successful implementation of programme activities across the whole school. However, there was less evidence of positive student behavioral change. Amongst a range of possibilities to account for the findings, one explanation is the organizational challenges of delivering a complex and ambitious programme in the secondary school setting. This suggests the need to develop food citizenship programmes that combine long term institutional reforms alongside focused interventions with specific groups of students. It also highlights the case for ensuring a place for food related citizenship on the educational policy agenda. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civics and Citizenship in Its Global Context)
Open AccessArticle Controversies and Generational Differences: Young People’s Identities in Some European States
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(2), 91-104; doi:10.3390/educsci2020091
Received: 22 February 2012 / Revised: 17 April 2012 / Accepted: 18 April 2012 / Published: 21 May 2012
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Abstract
This article explores how young people (aged 12–18) in the four Visegrad states of Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and the Czech Republic are constructing their identities, particularly their sense of attachment to their country and to Europe. This generation is of particular significance, [...] Read more.
This article explores how young people (aged 12–18) in the four Visegrad states of Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and the Czech Republic are constructing their identities, particularly their sense of attachment to their country and to Europe. This generation is of particular significance, in that they are the first generation for many years to have been born and socialised in wholly independent states that are in a relatively peaceful and stable state. Data was collected through 41 focus groups, conducted in 11 different locations in the different states, and were analysed in terms of the degree of enthusiasm expressed for civic institutions and cultural practices related to the country and to Europe. Two particular areas were identified: the sense of generational difference and the ways in which different groups created “other” communities, within and without their country’s borders. These parameters allow us to distinguish the significant communities that these young people are creating in order to make sense of their social and political worlds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civics and Citizenship in Its Global Context)
Open AccessArticle Making School Happen: Children-Parent-Teacher Collaboration as A Practice of Citizenship
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(2), 105-120; doi:10.3390/educsci2020105
Received: 14 February 2012 / Revised: 25 May 2012 / Accepted: 11 June 2012 / Published: 21 June 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (201 KB) | XML Full-text
Abstract
The exercise of citizenship is today understood as a duty and as a right to be enjoyed within any educational context. Within the school, all of its protagonists are invited to exercise practices of citizenship. No one is excluded; even the less [...] Read more.
The exercise of citizenship is today understood as a duty and as a right to be enjoyed within any educational context. Within the school, all of its protagonists are invited to exercise practices of citizenship. No one is excluded; even the less important parties have the right to participate in decisions that, for some reason, may have an influence on their academic life. The citizenship of the child is, thus, a challenge to the changing political, social and educational structures, to the transformation of institutions and to cultural renewal. The existence of harmonious relations between the educational community, the school, the children and the family is dependent on everyone’s ability to understand and communicate with each other. Parents and teachers have made a commitment to a fruitful and unison dialogue on behalf of the quality of education. In this article, we set out from an analysis of the new social realities and of the different meanings assigned to education, to afterwards reflect upon the current educational values and upon the practices that are consistent with those purposes. Citizenship, as well as autonomy, rise, thus, as central concepts, in which each educational community finds reasons for Making School Happen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civics and Citizenship in Its Global Context)

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