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Technologies 2018, 6(1), 12; doi:10.3390/technologies6010012

Eye-Gaze Control Technology as Early Intervention for a Non-Verbal Young Child with High Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

1
Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, 114 18 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, 581 83 Norrköping, Sweden
3
Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden
4
The Swedish National Center for Rett Syndrome & Related Disorders, 832 23 Frösön, Sweden
5
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, 751 22 Uppsala, Sweden
6
Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, 702 81 Örebro, Sweden
This paper is an extended version of our paper in Proceedings of AAATE2017 Congres, Sheffield, UK, 13–14 September 2017; with permission from IOS Press.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 5 January 2018 / Accepted: 10 January 2018 / Published: 16 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from AAATE2017 Congress)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1000 KB, uploaded 16 January 2018]   |  

Abstract

Assistive technology (AT) can be used as early intervention in order to reduce activity limitations in play and communication. This longitudinal case study examines eye-gaze control technology as early intervention for a young child with high spinal cord injury without the ability to make sounds. The young child was followed by repeated measures concerning performance and communication from baseline at 9 months to 26 months, and finalized at 36 months by field observations in the home setting. The results showed eye-gaze performance and frequency of use of eye-gaze control technology increased over time. Goals set at 15 months concerning learning and using the AT; naming objects and interactions with family was successfully completed at 26 months. Communicative functions regarding obtaining objects and social interaction increased from unintentional actions to purposeful choices and interactions. At 36 months, the toddler was partly independent in eye gazing, used all activities provided, and made independent choices. In conclusion, the results show that a 9-month-old child with profound motor disabilities can benefit from eye-gaze control technology in order to gradually perform activities, socially interact with family members, and make choices. View Full-Text
Keywords: tetraplegia; gaze-based assistive technology; communication; goal directed activities; self-help devices tetraplegia; gaze-based assistive technology; communication; goal directed activities; self-help devices
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Hemmingsson, H.; Ahlsten, G.; Wandin, H.; Rytterström, P.; Borgestig, M. Eye-Gaze Control Technology as Early Intervention for a Non-Verbal Young Child with High Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report. Technologies 2018, 6, 12.

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