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Pharmacy 2016, 4(4), 32; doi:10.3390/pharmacy4040032

Retrospective Evaluation of Pharmacist Interventions on Use of Antimicrobials Using a Clinical Surveillance Software in a Small Community Hospital

1
Sentara Princess Ann Hospital, 2025 Green Mitchell Drive, Virginia Beach, VA 23456, USA
2
UnityPoint Health-St. Luke’s, Pharmacy Department, 2720 Stone Park Boulevard, Sioux City, IA 51104, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Sui Yung CHAN and Lita Sui Tjien CHEW
Received: 29 August 2016 / Revised: 13 October 2016 / Accepted: 18 October 2016 / Published: 21 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hospital Pharmacy)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [190 KB, uploaded 21 October 2016]

Abstract

The Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America “Guidelines for Developing an Institutional Program to Enhance Antimicrobial Stewardship” recommend the use of computer-based surveillance programs for efficient and thorough identification of potential interventions as part of an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP). This retrospective study examined the benefit of utilizing a clinical surveillance software program to help guide antimicrobial therapy in an inpatient setting, in a small community hospital, without a formal ASP. The electronic health record (EHR) was used to retrieve documentations for the following types of antibiotic interventions: culture surveillance, duplicate therapy, duration of therapy and renal dose adjustments. The numbers of interventions made during the three-month periods before and after implementation of the clinical surveillance software were compared. Antibiotic related interventions aggregated to 144 and 270 in the pre- and post-implementation time frame, respectively (p < 0.0001). The total number of antibiotic interventions overall and interventions in three of the four sub-categories increased significantly from the pre-implementation to post-implementation period. Clinical surveillance software is a valuable tool to assist pharmacists in evaluating antimicrobial therapy. View Full-Text
Keywords: antibiotic interventions; antimicrobial stewardship program; clinical surveillance software; sentri7® antibiotic interventions; antimicrobial stewardship program; clinical surveillance software; sentri7®
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Huber, S.R.; Fullas, F.; Nelson, K.R.; Ailts, L.B.; Stratton, J.M.; Padomek, M.T. Retrospective Evaluation of Pharmacist Interventions on Use of Antimicrobials Using a Clinical Surveillance Software in a Small Community Hospital. Pharmacy 2016, 4, 32.

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