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Aerospace, Volume 1, Issue 1 (June 2014), Pages 1-51

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Research

Open AccessArticle Robust Flight Control Design to Minimize Aircraft Loss-of-Control Incidents
Aerospace 2014, 1(1), 1-17; doi:10.3390/aerospace1010001
Received: 12 August 2013 / Revised: 25 September 2013 / Accepted: 16 October 2013 / Published: 7 November 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (460 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A pseudo-sliding mode control synthesis procedure discussed previously in the literature is applied to the design of a control system for a nonlinear model of the NASA Langley Generic Transport Model. The complete vehicle model is included as an appendix. The goal [...] Read more.
A pseudo-sliding mode control synthesis procedure discussed previously in the literature is applied to the design of a control system for a nonlinear model of the NASA Langley Generic Transport Model. The complete vehicle model is included as an appendix. The goal of the design effort is the synthesis of a robust control system to minimize aircraft loss-of-control by preserving fundamental pilot input—system response characteristics across the flight envelope, here including the possibility of actuator damage. The design is carried out completely in the frequency domain and is described by a ten-step synthesis procedure, also previously introduced it the literature. Five different flight tasks are considered in computer simulations of the completed design demonstrating the stability and performance robustness of the control system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driving Forward Aerospace Innovation)
Open AccessArticle Student Expectations from Participating in a Small Spacecraft Development Program
Aerospace 2014, 1(1), 18-30; doi:10.3390/aerospace1010018
Received: 25 September 2013 / Revised: 24 October 2013 / Accepted: 6 November 2013 / Published: 12 November 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (350 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The number of small spacecraft development programs in the United States and worldwide have increased significantly over the course of the last 10 years. This paper analyzes reasons for the growth in these programs by assessing what student participants hope to gain [...] Read more.
The number of small spacecraft development programs in the United States and worldwide have increased significantly over the course of the last 10 years. This paper analyzes reasons for the growth in these programs by assessing what student participants hope to gain from their participation. Participants in the OpenOrbiter Small Spacecraft Development Initiative at the University of North Dakota were surveyed at the beginning of an academic year to determine why they were planning to participate in the program again or join and participate for the first time. This paper presents the results of this survey. Full article
Open AccessArticle The Space Mission Design Example Using LEO Bolos
Aerospace 2014, 1(1), 31-51; doi:10.3390/aerospace1010031
Received: 18 October 2013 / Revised: 13 December 2013 / Accepted: 13 December 2013 / Published: 27 December 2013
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Abstract
Four sample space launch missions were designed using rotating momentum transfer tethers (bolos) within low Earth orbit and a previously unknown phenomenon of “aerospinning” was identified and simulated. The momentum transfer tethers were found to be only marginally more efficient than the [...] Read more.
Four sample space launch missions were designed using rotating momentum transfer tethers (bolos) within low Earth orbit and a previously unknown phenomenon of “aerospinning” was identified and simulated. The momentum transfer tethers were found to be only marginally more efficient than the use of chemical rocket boosters. Insufficient power density of modern spacecrafts was identified as the principal inhibitory factor for tether usage as a means of launch-assistance, with power densities at least 10 W/kg required for effective bolos operation. Full article

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