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Climate, Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2014), Pages 1-27

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Climate in 2013
Climate 2014, 2(1), 17; doi:10.3390/cli2010017
Received: 25 February 2014 / Accepted: 25 February 2014 / Published: 25 February 2014
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Abstract The editors of Climate would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2013. [...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle Satellite-Detected Carbon Monoxide Pollution during 2000–2012: Examining Global Trends and also Regional Anthropogenic Periods over China, the EU and the USA
Climate 2014, 2(1), 1-16; doi:10.3390/cli2010001
Received: 23 December 2013 / Revised: 5 February 2014 / Accepted: 6 February 2014 / Published: 13 February 2014
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Abstract
In this paper, we test if any statistically significant periodicities are detectable in carbon monoxide emissions over China, the European Union, and the United States of America. To do this, we performed a period analysis using 10 years of daily-averaged data, from the
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In this paper, we test if any statistically significant periodicities are detectable in carbon monoxide emissions over China, the European Union, and the United States of America. To do this, we performed a period analysis using 10 years of daily-averaged data, from the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument. Besides a seasonal period, we found no clearly detectable periods at any timescale with the exception of a strong signal at 2.28 days. This period was observed over all tested regions and persisted when larger (hemisphere-wide) regions were considered. However, rather than resulting from a physical variation in carbon monoxide, it resulted from day-to-day changes in the area covered by MOPITT on-board its polar-orbiting satellite platform. We also examined linear trends over the dataset, and found that MOPITT identifies several centers of increasing carbon monoxide concentration—the largest being over China—although globally MOPITT reports a significant decrease in carbon monoxide has occurred over the past decade. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emission Impacts on Aerosol-Climate Feedbacks)

Other

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Open AccessShort Note Understanding Climate Change on the California Coast: Accounting for Extreme Daily Events among Long-Term Trends
Climate 2014, 2(1), 18-27; doi:10.3390/cli2010018
Received: 25 November 2013 / Revised: 14 January 2014 / Accepted: 12 February 2014 / Published: 27 February 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (587 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The majority of weather station records indicate that surface air temperatures have been warming in California between 1950 and 2005. Temperature data from the mid-1990s to the present were analyzed for stations on California Central Coast near Big Sur (Monterey County) to better
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The majority of weather station records indicate that surface air temperatures have been warming in California between 1950 and 2005. Temperature data from the mid-1990s to the present were analyzed for stations on California Central Coast near Big Sur (Monterey County) to better understand potential for climate change in this biologically unique region. Results showed that daily temperatures in both the winter and summer seasons have cooled the Big Sur coast, particularly after 2003. A current hypothesis is that observed coastal California cooling derives from greenhouse gas-induced regional warming of the inland Central Valley and Sierra Nevada foothill areas, resulting in stronger sustained on-shore sea-breeze flow. Closer examination of daily temperature records at a station location near the Big Sur coast revealed that, even as average monthly maximum temperatures (Tmax) have decreased gradually, the number of extreme warm summer days (Tmax > 37 °C) has also increased by several fold in frequency. Overall patterns in the station records since the mid-1990s indicated that diurnal temperature ranges are widening on the Big Sur coast, with markedly cooler nighttime temperatures (frequently in the wet winter season) followed by slightly higher-than-average daytime temperatures, especially during the warm, dry summer season. Full article

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