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Plants 2015, 4(3), 393-411; doi:10.3390/plants4030393

Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species

1
Department of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Gronostajowa 7, Krakow 30-387, Poland
2
Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Gronostajowa 7, Krakow 30-387, Poland
3
Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Gronostajowa 7, Krakow 30-387, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Salma Balazadeh
Received: 4 May 2015 / Revised: 16 June 2015 / Accepted: 18 June 2015 / Published: 8 July 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Senescence)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [689 KB, uploaded 8 July 2015]   |  

Abstract

Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the earliest responses of plant cells to various biotic and abiotic stresses. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by oxidation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene expression, and decomposition of biomembranes. On the other hand, they also have a signaling role and changes in production of ROS can act as signals that change the transcription of genes that favor the acclimation of plants to abiotic stresses. Among the ROS, it is believed that H2O2 causes the largest changes in the levels of gene expression in plants. A wide range of plant responses has been found to be triggered by H2O2 such as acclimation to drought, photooxidative stress, and induction of senescence. Our knowledge on signaling roles of singlet oxygen (1O2) has been limited by its short lifetime, but recent experiments with a flu mutant demonstrated that singlet oxygen does not act primarily as a toxin but rather as a signal that activates several stress-response pathways. In this review we summarize the latest progress on the signaling roles of ROS during senescence and abiotic stresses and we give a short overview of the methods that can be used for their assessment. View Full-Text
Keywords: leaf senescence; abiotic stresses; reactive oxygen species; hydrogen peroxide; singlet oxygen; superoxide anion leaf senescence; abiotic stresses; reactive oxygen species; hydrogen peroxide; singlet oxygen; superoxide anion
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Jajic, I.; Sarna, T.; Strzalka, K. Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species. Plants 2015, 4, 393-411.

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