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J. Dev. Biol. 2014, 2(4), 210-229; doi:10.3390/jdb2040210

Observations on Lumbar Spinal Cord Recovery after Lesion in Lizards Indicates Regeneration of a Cellular and Fibrous Bridge Reconnecting the Injured Cord

Comparative Histolab and Dipartimento di Biologia, Geologia e Scienze Ambientali, University of Bologna, via Selmi 3, 40126, Bologna, Italy
Received: 28 October 2014 / Revised: 24 November 2014 / Accepted: 9 December 2014 / Published: 19 December 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration)
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Abstract

The lumbar spinal cords of lizards were transected, but after the initial paralysis most lizards recovered un-coordinated movements of hind limbs. At 25-45 days post-lesion about 50% of lizards were capable of walking with a limited coordination. Histological analysis showed that the spinal cord was transected and the ependyma of the central canal formed two enlargements to seal the proximal and distal ends of the severed spinal cord. Glial and few small neurons were formed while bridge axons crossed the gap between the proximal and the distal stumps of the transected spinal cord as was confirmed by retrograde tract-tracing technique. The bridging fibers likely derived from interneurons located in the central and dorsal grey matter of the proximal spinal cord stump suggesting they belong to the local central locomotory pattern generator circuit. The limited recovery of hind limb movements may derive from the regeneration or sprouting of short proprio-spinal axons joining the two stumps of the transected spinal cord. The present observations indicate that the study on spinal cord regeneration in lizards can give insights on the permissive conditions that favor nerve regeneration in amniotes. View Full-Text
Keywords: lizard; lumbar spinal cord; transection; regeneration; histology; tract-tracing lizard; lumbar spinal cord; transection; regeneration; histology; tract-tracing
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Alibardi, L. Observations on Lumbar Spinal Cord Recovery after Lesion in Lizards Indicates Regeneration of a Cellular and Fibrous Bridge Reconnecting the Injured Cord. J. Dev. Biol. 2014, 2, 210-229.

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