Next Article in Journal
A Geometric Framework for Detection of Critical Points in a Trajectory Using Convex Hulls
Previous Article in Journal
Using Monte Carlo Simulation to Improve the Performance of Semivariograms for Choosing the Remote Sensing Imagery Resolution for Natural Resource Surveys: Case Study on Three Counties in East, Central, and West China
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7010015

Are We in Boswash Yet? A Multi-Source Geodata Approach to Spatially Delimit Urban Corridors

1
Department of Geoinformatics, University of Salzburg, 5020 Salzburg, Austria
2
Earth Observation Center, Remote Sensing Data Center, German Aerospace Center (DLR), 82234 Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 November 2017 / Revised: 14 December 2017 / Accepted: 23 December 2017 / Published: 4 January 2018
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3726 KB, uploaded 16 January 2018]   |  

Abstract

The delimitation of urban space is conceptually elusive and fuzzy. Commonly, urban areas are delimited through administrative boundaries. These artificial, fixed boundaries, however, do not necessarily represent the actual built-up extent, the urban catchment, or the economic linkage within and across neighboring metropolitan regions. For an approach to spatially delimit an urban corridor—a generically defined concept of a massive urban area—we use the Boston to Washington (Boswash) region as an example. This area has been consistently conceptualized in literature as bounded urban space. We develop a method to spatially delimit the urban corridor using multi-source geodata (built-up extent, infrastructure and socioeconomic data) which are based on a grid rather than on administrative units. Threshold approaches for the input data serve to construct Boswash as varying connected territorial spaces, allowing us to investigate the variability of possible spatial forms of the area, i.e., to overcome the simple dichotomous classification in favor of a probability-based differentiation. Our transparent multi-layer approach, validated through income data, can easily be modified by using different input datasets while maintaining the underlying idea that the likelihood of an area being part of an urban corridor is flexible, i.e., in our case a factor of how many input layers return positive results. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban corridor; spatial analysis; remote sensing; urban areas; pixel-based classification; fuzzy boundaries urban corridor; spatial analysis; remote sensing; urban areas; pixel-based classification; fuzzy boundaries
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Georg, I.; Blaschke, T.; Taubenböck, H. Are We in Boswash Yet? A Multi-Source Geodata Approach to Spatially Delimit Urban Corridors. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7, 15.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. EISSN 2220-9964 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top