ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(3), 1058-1076; doi:10.3390/ijgi3031058
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Where 2.0 Australia’s Environment? Crowdsourcing, Volunteered Geographic Information, and Citizens Acting as Sensors for Environmental Sustainability

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Received: 4 March 2014; in revised form: 8 July 2014 / Accepted: 6 August 2014 / Published: 14 August 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geoweb 2.0)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Crowdsourcing, volunteered geographic information (VGI) and citizens acting as sensors are currently being used in Australia via GeoWeb 2.0 applications for environmental sustainability purposes. This paper situates the origins of these practices, phenomena and concepts within the intersection of Web 2.0 and emerging online and mobile spatial technologies, herein called the GeoWeb 2.0. The significance of these origins is akin to a revolution in the way information is created, curated and distributed, attributed with transformative social impacts. Applications for environmental sustainability have the potential to be similarly transformative or disruptive. However, Web 2.0 is not described or conceptualised consistently within the literature. Australian examples implementing the GeoWeb 2.0 for environmental sustainability are diverse, but the reasons for this are difficult to ascertain. There is little published by the creators of such applications on their decisions, and Australian research is nascent, occurring across a variety of disciplinary approaches. While a substantial research literature emanates from North America and Europe, its transferability to Australia requires careful assessment. This paper contributes to this assessment by providing a review of relevant literature in the context of Australian examples for environmental sustainability.
Keywords: Web 2.0; GeoWeb 2.0; Geospatial Web 2.0; social media; crowdsourcing; citizens as sensors; volunteered geographic information; environmental sustainability; environmental information
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MDPI and ACS Style

Clark, A. Where 2.0 Australia’s Environment? Crowdsourcing, Volunteered Geographic Information, and Citizens Acting as Sensors for Environmental Sustainability. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3, 1058-1076.

AMA Style

Clark A. Where 2.0 Australia’s Environment? Crowdsourcing, Volunteered Geographic Information, and Citizens Acting as Sensors for Environmental Sustainability. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information. 2014; 3(3):1058-1076.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Clark, Alister. 2014. "Where 2.0 Australia’s Environment? Crowdsourcing, Volunteered Geographic Information, and Citizens Acting as Sensors for Environmental Sustainability." ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 3, no. 3: 1058-1076.

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