Next Article in Journal
Robust Composite High-Order Super-Twisting Sliding Mode Control of Robot Manipulators
Previous Article in Journal
Adaptive Image Thresholding of Yellow Peppers for a Harvesting Robot
Article Menu
Issue 1 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Robotics 2018, 7(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/robotics7010012

Design of an Embedded Multi-Camera Vision System—A Case Study in Mobile Robotics

1,2,†,* , 1
,
2,3
and
1,2
1
INEGI—Institute of Science and Innovation in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
2
FEUP— Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
3
INESC TEC—INESC Technology and Science (formerly INESC Porto), 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Current address: Campus da FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 400 Porto, Portugal.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 January 2018 / Revised: 19 February 2018 / Accepted: 22 February 2018 / Published: 26 February 2018
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3493 KB, uploaded 22 March 2018]   |  

Abstract

The purpose of this work is to explore the design principles for a Real-Time Robotic Multi Camera Vision System, in a case study involving a real world competition of autonomous driving. Design practices from vision and real-time research areas are applied into a Real-Time Robotic Vision application, thus exemplifying good algorithm design practices, the advantages of employing the “zero copy one pass” methodology and associated trade-offs leading to the selection of a controller platform. The vision tasks under study are: (i) recognition of a “flat” signal; and (ii) track following, requiring 3D reconstruction. This research firstly improves the used algorithms for the mentioned tasks and finally selects the controller hardware. Optimization for the shown algorithms yielded from 1.5 times to 190 times improvements, always with acceptable quality for the target application, with algorithm optimization being more important on lower computing power platforms. Results also include a 3-cm and five-degree accuracy for lane tracking and 100% accuracy for signalling panel recognition, which are better than most results found in the literature for this application. Clear results comparing different PC platforms for the mentioned Robotic Vision tasks are also shown, demonstrating trade-offs between accuracy and computing power, leading to the proper choice of control platform. The presented design principles are portable to other applications, where Real-Time constraints exist. View Full-Text
Keywords: camera as a sensor; real-time vision; robotic vision; lane tracking; signalling panel recognition; zero copy one pass camera as a sensor; real-time vision; robotic vision; lane tracking; signalling panel recognition; zero copy one pass
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Costa, V.; Cebola, P.; Sousa, A.; Reis, A. Design of an Embedded Multi-Camera Vision System—A Case Study in Mobile Robotics. Robotics 2018, 7, 12.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Robotics EISSN 2218-6581 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top