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Cosmetics, Volume 3, Issue 4 (December 2016)

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Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessArticle Cosmetics Utilization Practice in Jigjiga Town, Eastern Ethiopia: A Community Based Cross-Sectional Study
Cosmetics 2016, 3(4), 40; doi:10.3390/cosmetics3040040
Received: 20 August 2016 / Revised: 12 November 2016 / Accepted: 24 November 2016 / Published: 1 December 2016
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Abstract
The trend of cosmetics utilization has increased globally; however, the exact amount of usage is not researched well. Lack of population awareness on proper use of cosmetics, particularly in developing countries, causes a prominent health challenge. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess
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The trend of cosmetics utilization has increased globally; however, the exact amount of usage is not researched well. Lack of population awareness on proper use of cosmetics, particularly in developing countries, causes a prominent health challenge. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the cosmetics utilization practices in Jigjiga town, Eastern Ethiopia. A community based cross-sectional study, using a semi-structured questionnaire, was used to assess factors associated with cosmetics use. Of the 559 participants, 93% used at least one type of cosmetics in the two weeks prior to the survey. The most commonly used products were body creams and lotions (68%), shampoos and conditioners (35%), and deodorants and perfumes (29%). Being single, female, and in the age group of 18–20 years increased the odds of cosmetics utilization. However, being in primary school and being self-employed showed a less likely use of cosmetics. Two hundred forty-seven (44%) of the interviewed household members reported that they use traditional herbal cosmetics. A higher likelihood of traditional herbal cosmetics use was observed in the age group of 18–20 years. This study indicated that the community in Jigjiga town use different types of cosmetics. Education, occupation, marital status, age, and gender were all important factors that determined the use of cosmetics in the study area. Full article
Open AccessArticle Stability of Sun Creams Formulated with Thermal Spring Waters from Ourense, Northwest Spain
Cosmetics 2016, 3(4), 42; doi:10.3390/cosmetics3040042
Received: 27 July 2016 / Revised: 3 November 2016 / Accepted: 6 December 2016 / Published: 16 December 2016
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Abstract
Sun protection creams were formulated with a commercial rosemary extract and with thermal waters from different springs in the Northwest Spain. A six month stability study was carried out and microbiological and chemical stability, as well as sensorial characteristics, were evaluated. In all
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Sun protection creams were formulated with a commercial rosemary extract and with thermal waters from different springs in the Northwest Spain. A six month stability study was carried out and microbiological and chemical stability, as well as sensorial characteristics, were evaluated. In all creams, the mesophilic count always remained low (under 10 cfu/mL) and most of them showed greater antioxidant stability than the control cream formulated with distilled water. Color was stable during storage in almost all creams. Sensory analysis showed a quite similar valoration of the creams regardless the sex of the panelists, and small differences were found between consumers aged 30–40 and >40. Formulations elaborated from Outariz and A Chavasqueira thermal waters were preferred to those prepared with distilled water as a control. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Topical Retinol Restores Type I Collagen Production in Photoaged Forearm Skin within Four Weeks
Cosmetics 2016, 3(4), 35; doi:10.3390/cosmetics3040035
Received: 26 August 2016 / Revised: 16 September 2016 / Accepted: 26 September 2016 / Published: 29 September 2016
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Abstract
Production of type I collagen (COL1), the major structural protein of the skin, declines during aging, leading to skin thinning and becoming fragile, which increases the risk of bruising and wound healing disorders in the elderly. Topical treatments that can restore COL1 synthesis
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Production of type I collagen (COL1), the major structural protein of the skin, declines during aging, leading to skin thinning and becoming fragile, which increases the risk of bruising and wound healing disorders in the elderly. Topical treatments that can restore COL1 synthesis and ultimately COL1 content in aged skin hold promise to improve skin health. Much effort has been spent on developing agents that can safely and effectively enhance COL1 synthesis in aged skin. However, how fast and to what extent COL1 production in aged skin can be enhanced by a topical treatment remains unclear. Herein, we investigated a four-week topical retinol (ROL) treatment. A one-day occlusion of ROL (0.4%) or vehicle was applied on photoaged forearms of elderly (>65 years old) subjects once a week for four weeks. Vehicle was also applied on forearms of young (23–33 years) subjects in the same manner. Skin samples were obtained one week after the last treatment and analyzed for COL1 synthesis. We found that the ROL treatment increased the level of COL1 mRNA (2.3-fold) and proCOL1 protein (1.8-fold) in photoaged forearms to levels similar to that of young forearms within four weeks. Our study proves the concept that reduced COL1 production in aged skin can be readily restored. In addition, our study provides an evidence-based foundation for developing COL1-enhancing topical agents, and establishes a reliable and practical efficacy test for evaluating such agents. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Skin Whitening Cosmetics: Feedback and Challenges in the Development of Natural Skin Lighteners
Cosmetics 2016, 3(4), 36; doi:10.3390/cosmetics3040036
Received: 28 September 2016 / Revised: 21 October 2016 / Accepted: 24 October 2016 / Published: 28 October 2016
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Abstract
With the public’s growing interest in skin whitening, lightening ingredients only used under dermatological supervision until recently, are more and more frequently incorporated into cosmetic formulas. The active agents that lighten skin tone are either natural or synthetic substances, and may act at
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With the public’s growing interest in skin whitening, lightening ingredients only used under dermatological supervision until recently, are more and more frequently incorporated into cosmetic formulas. The active agents that lighten skin tone are either natural or synthetic substances, and may act at various levels of melanogenesis. They are used to treat various skin pigmentation disorders or simply to obtain a lighter skin tone as whiter skin may be synonymous of wealth, health, youth, and/or beauty in different cultures. However, recent studies demonstrated the adverse effects of some of these ingredients, leading to their interdiction or restricted use under the European Directive and several other international regulations. After an overview of skin whitening practices and the associated risks, this article provides insight into the mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and the biological assays available to attest the lightening activity of individual ingredients. The legislation dealing with the use of skin lighteners is then discussed. As traditional depigmenting agents such as hydroquinone and corticosteroids are of safety concern, the potential of natural extracts has been investigated more and more; finally, a synthesis of three years of research in our laboratory for such plant extracts will be given. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Polyamide Microparticles Containing Vitamin C by Interfacial Polymerization: An Approach by Design of Experimentation
Cosmetics 2016, 3(4), 38; doi:10.3390/cosmetics3040038
Received: 21 September 2016 / Revised: 19 October 2016 / Accepted: 20 October 2016 / Published: 2 November 2016
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Abstract
Vitamin C is widely use in cosmetics and pharmaceutics products for its active properties. However ascorbic acid shows unfavourable chemical instability such as oxidation leading to formulation problems. Therefore, carriers, such as micro- and nanoparticles, have been widely investigated as delivery systems for
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Vitamin C is widely use in cosmetics and pharmaceutics products for its active properties. However ascorbic acid shows unfavourable chemical instability such as oxidation leading to formulation problems. Therefore, carriers, such as micro- and nanoparticles, have been widely investigated as delivery systems for vitamin C to improve its beneficial effects in skin treatment. However, none of the previous studies have been able to produce microparticles with a high encapsulation entrapment of vitamin C. The aim of the present study is to use an experimental design to optimize the synthesis of polyamide microparticles for the delivery of ascorbic acid. The effect of four formulation parameters on microparticles properties (size and morphology, encapsulation efficiency and yield, release kinetics) were investigated using a surface response design. Finally, we were able to obtain stable microparticles containing more than 65% of vitamin C. This result confirms the effectiveness of using design of experiments for the optimisation of microparticle formulation and supports the proposal of using them as candidate for the delivery of vitamin C in skin treatment. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview Essential of Hair Care Cosmetics
Cosmetics 2016, 3(4), 34; doi:10.3390/cosmetics3040034
Received: 18 July 2016 / Revised: 12 September 2016 / Accepted: 20 September 2016 / Published: 27 September 2016
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Abstract
Nowadays, hair care and style play a very important role in people’s physical aspect and self-perception. Hair cosmetics can be distinguished into two main categories: cosmetics with temporary effect on the hair, for example shampoos, conditioners, sprays, and temporary colors; and cosmetics with
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Nowadays, hair care and style play a very important role in people’s physical aspect and self-perception. Hair cosmetics can be distinguished into two main categories: cosmetics with temporary effect on the hair, for example shampoos, conditioners, sprays, and temporary colors; and cosmetics with permanent effect on the hair, such as permanent waves, relaxers, bleaches and permanent colors. These cosmetic procedures may induce hair abnormalities. We provide an overview on the most important characteristics of these procedures, analyzing components and effects on the hair. Finally, we evaluated new camouflage techniques and tattoo scalp. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hair Care Cosmetics)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Lipid Self-Assemblies and Nanostructured Emulsions for Cosmetic Formulations
Cosmetics 2016, 3(4), 37; doi:10.3390/cosmetics3040037
Received: 2 September 2016 / Revised: 4 October 2016 / Accepted: 26 October 2016 / Published: 31 October 2016
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Abstract
A majority of cosmetic products that we encounter on daily basis contain lipid constituents in solubilized or insolubilized forms. Due to their amphiphilic nature, the lipid molecules spontaneously self-assemble into a remarkable range of nanostructures when mixed with water. This review illustrates the
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A majority of cosmetic products that we encounter on daily basis contain lipid constituents in solubilized or insolubilized forms. Due to their amphiphilic nature, the lipid molecules spontaneously self-assemble into a remarkable range of nanostructures when mixed with water. This review illustrates the formation and finely tunable properties of self-assembled lipid nanostructures and their hierarchically organized derivatives, as well as their relevance to the development of cosmetic formulations. These lipid systems can be modulated into various physical forms suitable for topical administration including fluids, gels, creams, pastes and dehydrated films. Moreover, they are capable of encapsulating hydrophilic, hydrophobic as well as amphiphilic active ingredients owing to their special morphological characters. Nano-hybrid materials with more elegant properties can be designed by combining nanostructured lipid systems with other nanomaterials including a hydrogelator, silica nanoparticles, clays and carbon nanomaterials. The smart materials reviewed here may well be the future of innovative cosmetic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotechnologies in Cosmetics)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Effective Active Ingredients Obtained through Biotechnology
Cosmetics 2016, 3(4), 39; doi:10.3390/cosmetics3040039
Received: 9 September 2016 / Revised: 11 November 2016 / Accepted: 14 November 2016 / Published: 18 November 2016
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Abstract
The history of cosmetics develops in parallel to the history of man, associated with fishing, hunting, and superstition in the beginning, and later with medicine and pharmacy. Over the ages, together with human progress, cosmetics have changed continuously and nowadays the cosmetic market
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The history of cosmetics develops in parallel to the history of man, associated with fishing, hunting, and superstition in the beginning, and later with medicine and pharmacy. Over the ages, together with human progress, cosmetics have changed continuously and nowadays the cosmetic market is global and highly competitive, where terms such as quality, efficacy and safety are essential. Consumers’ demands are extremely sophisticated, and thus scientific research and product development have become vital to meet them. Moreover, consumers are aware about environmental and sustainability issues, and thus not harming the environment represents a key consideration when developing a new cosmetic ingredient. The latest tendencies of cosmetics are based on advanced research into how to interfere with skin cell aging: research includes the use of biotechnology-derived ingredients and the analysis of their effects on the biology of the cells, in terms of gene regulation, protein expression and enzymatic activity measures. In this review, we will provide some examples of cosmetic active ingredients developed through biotechnological systems, whose activity on the skin has been scientifically proved through in vitro and clinical studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficacy Assessment of Cosmetics)

Other

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Open AccessFeature PaperCase Report Green Nanotechnology Serving the Bioeconomy: Natural Beauty Masks to Save the Environment
Cosmetics 2016, 3(4), 41; doi:10.3390/cosmetics3040041
Received: 9 June 2016 / Revised: 14 November 2016 / Accepted: 14 November 2016 / Published: 5 December 2016
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Abstract
According to United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), ensuring a clean and healthy environment will provide multiple benefits to society and economy. Sustainable production, followed by appropriate management of industrial and agricultural waste, will protect and enhance biodiversity and ecosystem services. To achieve this
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According to United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), ensuring a clean and healthy environment will provide multiple benefits to society and economy. Sustainable production, followed by appropriate management of industrial and agricultural waste, will protect and enhance biodiversity and ecosystem services. To achieve this objective, specific policies must be put in place and specific actions performed for making a low-carbon and resource-efficient economy with reduced production of petrol-derived goods. The aim of the study has been to produce effective and safe anti-age beauty masks made of non-woven tissues based on the use of chitin nanofibril (CN) and nanolignin (LG), obtained from crustaceans and plant biomass, respectively. To this purpose, nanoparticles and electrospun fibres have been characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering and SEM, while the safeness and effectiveness of the obtained tissues was verified in vitro on a culture of keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and controlled in vivo by expert dermatologists on 30 volunteer photo-aged women, by subjective and objective bioengineered methods. The in vitro results have shown that the beauty masks have no toxic effects on the viability of keratinocytes and fibroblasts treated by the Dimethyl Tetrazole (MTT) method, and exhibit a decreased expression of cytokines, playing a central role in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses in premature aging and environmental assaults. The reparative and antiaging effectiveness of these innovative beauty masks have been also verified on the release of Metallo Proteinase I (MMP-1) and the increased synthesis of collagen type I, reduced in skin aging. The first preliminary in vivo results, obtained by engineering methods, have confirmed the protective and rejuvenating activity shown by the in vitro study conducted on 30 voluntary women exhibiting signs of photoaging. The raw materials used are of natural origin being also respectful of the environment, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (EOCD) and EU programmes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotechnologies in Cosmetics)
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