Next Issue

Table of Contents

Cosmetics, Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2014), Pages 1-74

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-8
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessEditorial Cosmetics: A New Open Project
Cosmetics 2014, 1(1), 1-2; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1010001
Received: 14 May 2013 / Revised: 17 May 2013 / Accepted: 17 May 2013 / Published: 21 May 2013
PDF Full-text (112 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
It is my great pleasure to announce a newly launched open access journal, Cosmetics, published by MDPI, dedicated to this fascinating world. Do we need a new journal in this area? This was the question I had in mind before starting [...] Read more.
It is my great pleasure to announce a newly launched open access journal, Cosmetics, published by MDPI, dedicated to this fascinating world. Do we need a new journal in this area? This was the question I had in mind before starting the project and I will try to answer in the following paragraphs. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle Bio-Guided Targeting for Preservative and Anti-Ageing Cosmetic Ingredient Development
Cosmetics 2014, 1(1), 14-28; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1010014
Received: 25 September 2013 / Revised: 16 December 2013 / Accepted: 23 December 2013 / Published: 2 January 2014
PDF Full-text (356 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To develop a new antioxidant, antibacterial and natural cosmetic ingredient without cytotoxicity to skin cells, bioactive molecules contained in Kalanchoe pinnata leaf methanolic extract were targeted using semi-preparative HPLC fractionation linked to biological activity tests. Chromatographic effluent was collected at the column [...] Read more.
To develop a new antioxidant, antibacterial and natural cosmetic ingredient without cytotoxicity to skin cells, bioactive molecules contained in Kalanchoe pinnata leaf methanolic extract were targeted using semi-preparative HPLC fractionation linked to biological activity tests. Chromatographic effluent was collected at the column outlet into a 96 deep-well microplate, filling successively all the wells. After freeze-drying, the microplate was ready to use for different biological tests such as antimicrobial activity on microorganisms, skin cell viability and antioxidant activity on human keratinocyte cells. The injection of only 2.64 mg of crude extract into the HPLC system reveals a good correlation between the chromatographic peaks and the different biological activities. One fraction is mainly of interest since good antibacterial and antioxidant activities without cytotoxicity are observed. The analysis of this fraction using mass spectrometry allows the identification of glycoside derivatives of quercetin, isorhamnetin and kaempferol. Thus, a correlation between biological activity and the presence of these flavonoids is obtained. This screening method allows a rapid fractionation associated with a biological activity evaluation and a first molecular identification, saving time by limiting sample treatments and solvent consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Methods for Quality Control of Cosmetics)
Figures

Open AccessArticle In Vivo Cosmetic Product Efficacy Testing by Analyzing Epidermal Proteins Extracted from Tape Strips
Cosmetics 2014, 1(1), 29-36; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1010029
Received: 30 December 2013 / Revised: 25 January 2014 / Accepted: 27 January 2014 / Published: 14 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (279 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of this in vivo pilot study was to investigate whether differential biomarker analysis from skin tape strips could be used, not only to evaluate the difference between treated and untreated skin, but also to evaluate the effect of different product [...] Read more.
The objective of this in vivo pilot study was to investigate whether differential biomarker analysis from skin tape strips could be used, not only to evaluate the difference between treated and untreated skin, but also to evaluate the effect of different product treatments. Ten volunteers were included in the study, applying two different basic formulations on their forearms. After four weeks of product application, and also after one week of treatment remission, tape strips were collected from the different treatment sites, as well as from untreated skin. The biomarkers investigated were selected to cover different aspects of epidermal differentiation and in connection with moisturization and barrier function. Levels of Involucrin were increased in both treatments, compared to untreated skin, whereas the levels of Keratin-6 were decreased for both treatments. In addition, a pattern for increased levels of Hornerin and Claudin-1 was also detected. There were no significant differences between the two treatments, only for treatment compared to untreated, but there were tendencies for different effect on some of the biomarkers investigated, differences that may reach significance with increased sample size. The major differences between the two treatments in this study were seen after one week of product remission, although due to too small sample size these differences were not significant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ISBS/SICC 1st Joint International Congress)
Figures

Open AccessArticle In Vivo Non-Invasive Evaluation of Actinic Keratoses Response to Methyl-Aminolevulinate-Photodynamic Therapy (MAL-PDT) by Reflectance Confocal Microscopy
Cosmetics 2014, 1(1), 37-43; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1010037
Received: 12 January 2014 / Revised: 14 February 2014 / Accepted: 14 February 2014 / Published: 4 March 2014
PDF Full-text (1119 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) is an approved non-invasive treatment option for actinic keratoses (AKs). In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive tool for real-time imaging of epidermis and superficial dermis in vivo that has been previously reported to [...] Read more.
Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) is an approved non-invasive treatment option for actinic keratoses (AKs). In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive tool for real-time imaging of epidermis and superficial dermis in vivo that has been previously reported to facilitate the in vivo evaluation of skin lesions, including AKs. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of in vivo RCM in evaluating AKs response to MAL-PDT. For this reason a total of 10 biopsy-proven AKs were treated by MAL-PDT, according to standard PDT protocol for AKs. RCM investigation was performed before and after PDT and RCM-guided punch biopsies was taken at 3 months in all patients for histopathologic examination. At 3 months follow-up, complete clinical response was observed by clinical examination in 9 out of 10 lesions and a partial clinical response in 1 lesion. In vivo RCM detected two residual AKs in subclinical form, missed by clinical examination. Histological analysis confirmed these results. In vivo RCM may be a new alternative tool for the non-invasive diagnosis of AKs and evaluation of AKs response to non-invasive treatments, as MAL-PDT, improving the ability of dermatologists to diagnose AKs even in subclinical stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ISBS/SICC 1st Joint International Congress)
Open AccessArticle Tenskinmetric Evaluation of Surface Energy Changes in Adult Skin: Evidence from 834 Normal Subjects Monitored in Controlled Conditions
Cosmetics 2014, 1(1), 44-50; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1010044
Received: 12 January 2014 / Revised: 24 February 2014 / Accepted: 24 February 2014 / Published: 4 March 2014
PDF Full-text (628 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To evaluate the influence of the skin aging critical level on the adult skin epidermal functional state, an improved analytical method based on the skin surface energetic measurement (TVS modeling) was developed. Tenskinmetric measurements were carried out non-invasively in controlled conditions by [...] Read more.
To evaluate the influence of the skin aging critical level on the adult skin epidermal functional state, an improved analytical method based on the skin surface energetic measurement (TVS modeling) was developed. Tenskinmetric measurements were carried out non-invasively in controlled conditions by contact angle method using only a water-drop as reference standard liquid. Adult skin was monitored by TVS Observatory according to a specific and controlled thermal protocol (Camianta protocol) in use at the interconnected “Mamma Margherita Terme spa” of Terme Euganee. From June to November 2013, the surface free energy and the epidermal hydration level of adult skin were evaluated on arrival of 265 male and 569 female adult volunteers (51–90 years of age) and when they departed 2 weeks later. Sensitive measurements were carried out at 0.1 mN/m. High test compliance was obtained (93.2% of all guests). Very interesting results are obtained. The high sensitivity and discrimination power of tenskinmetry combined with a thermal Camianta protocol demonstrate the possibility to evaluate at baseline level the surface energetic changes and the skin reactivity which occurs on adult skin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ISBS/SICC 1st Joint International Congress)
Open AccessCommunication l-Ergothioneine Protects Skin Cells against UV-Induced Damage—A Preliminary Study
Cosmetics 2014, 1(1), 51-60; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1010051
Received: 31 December 2013 / Revised: 10 March 2014 / Accepted: 11 March 2014 / Published: 20 March 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (365 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many changes related to aging at the cellular level may be due to the physiological condition of mitochondria. One of the most common types of damage of mtDNA is the so-called “common deletion” referring to a deletion of 4977 base pairs. In [...] Read more.
Many changes related to aging at the cellular level may be due to the physiological condition of mitochondria. One of the most common types of damage of mtDNA is the so-called “common deletion” referring to a deletion of 4977 base pairs. In the skin cells this phenomenon probably is caused by oxidative damage of mtDNA induced by UV. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of the antioxidant l-ergothioneine on UV-induced damage in skin cells. The effect of l-ergothioneine on the reduced glutathione level was studied. The presence of the “common deletion” in human fibroblasts irradiated with UVA and treated with l-ergothioneine was evaluated by a polymerase chain reaction. We have demonstrated that l-ergothioneine enhanced the level of reduced glutathione and protected cells from the induction of a photoaging-associated mtDNA “common deletion”. In view of our results, l-ergothioneine could be an effective skin care and anti-photoaging ingredient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ISBS/SICC 1st Joint International Congress)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Open AccessReview Dimeric Surfactants: Promising Ingredients of Cosmetics and Toiletries
Cosmetics 2014, 1(1), 3-13; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1010003
Received: 29 August 2013 / Revised: 30 October 2013 / Accepted: 31 October 2013 / Published: 21 November 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (227 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Surfactants are an essential ingredient for cosmetic, toiletries and personal care products for enhancing their performance. Dimeric surfactants demonstrate superiority compared to conventional surfactants in all areas of application. Dimeric surfactants are extremely promising for utilization in various cosmetic formulations viz. [...] Read more.
Surfactants are an essential ingredient for cosmetic, toiletries and personal care products for enhancing their performance. Dimeric surfactants demonstrate superiority compared to conventional surfactants in all areas of application. Dimeric surfactants are extremely promising for utilization in various cosmetic formulations viz. shampoo, lotions, creams, conditioners etc. These surfactants possess extremely unique surface properties viz. lower surface tension, unique micellization, low critical micelle concentration (CMC) and antimicrobial activity, higher solubilization etc. Dimerics enhance the performances of cosmetics in an extraordinary manner and provide eco-friendly preparations for human epidermis. Full article
Figures

Open AccessReview Safety Evaluation of Cosmetic Ingredients: In Vitro Opportunities for the Identification of Contact Allergens
Cosmetics 2014, 1(1), 61-74; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1010061
Received: 5 February 2014 / Revised: 6 March 2014 / Accepted: 11 March 2014 / Published: 20 March 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (216 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis are undesired side effects in the development of drugs and cosmetics as well as after contact with environmental or industrial chemicals. Over the last decades, a great deal of progress has been made in the development of [...] Read more.
Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis are undesired side effects in the development of drugs and cosmetics as well as after contact with environmental or industrial chemicals. Over the last decades, a great deal of progress has been made in the development of alternative In vitro test to assess these issues. Driven by the 7th Amendment to the European Cosmetic Directive, the EU policy on chemicals (the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH) system), the update of the European legislation on the protection of animals used in research, and emerging visions and strategies for predicting toxicity, in vitro methods are likely to play a major role in the near future. On 12 December 2013, the European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM, part of the European Commission Joint Research Centre) published its Recommendation on the Direct Peptide Reactivity Assay (DPRA) for skin sensitization, capable of distinguishing sensitizers from non-sensitizers. Other assays (i.e., KeratinoSens™ assay) will follow shortly. While a number of methods are at various stages of development and use, currently it is not possible to rank chemicals for their sensitizing potency, an issue that is important for a full safety assessment. It is expected that a predictive method to totally replace animal testing will be in the form of a test battery comprising molecular, cell-based, and/or computational methods, the so-called “Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment”. This review aims to discuss the state-of-the-art in the field of in vitro assessment of contact sensitizers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue What Do You Know about Cosmetics?)
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Cosmetics Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
cosmetics@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Cosmetics
Back to Top