Next Article in Journal
Comparative Research on River Basin Management in the Sagami River Basin (Japan) and the Muda River Basin (Malaysia)
Previous Article in Journal
Rice Hulls as a Renewable Complex Material Resource
Article Menu
Issue 2 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Resources 2018, 7(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources7020032

An Assessment of Airport Sustainability, Part 2—Energy Management at Copenhagen Airport

1
School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Suan Dusit University, Hua Hin, Prachaup Khiri Khan 77110, Thailand
2
School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 March 2018 / Revised: 15 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [2653 KB, uploaded 24 May 2018]   |  

Abstract

Airports play a critical role in the air transport value chain. Each air transport value chain stakeholder requires energy to conduct their operations. Airports are extremely energy intensive. Greenhouse gases are a by-product from energy generation and usage. Consequently, airports are increasingly trying to sustainably manage their energy requirements as part of their environmental policies and strategies. This study used an exploratory qualitative and quantitative case study research approach to empirically examine Copenhagen Airport, Scandinavia’s major air traffic hub, sustainable airport energy management practices and energy-saving initiatives. For Copenhagen Airport, the most significant environmental impact factors occurring from energy usage are the CO2 emissions arising from both the air side and land side operations. Considering this, the airport has identified many ways to manage and mitigate the environmental impact from energy consumption on both the air and land side operations. Importantly, the application of technological solutions, systems and process enhancements and collaboration with key stakeholders has contributed to the airport’s success in mitigating the environmental impact from energy usage at the airport whilst at the same time achieving energy savings. View Full-Text
Keywords: airports; aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES); Copenhagen Airport; energy; light-emitting diodes (LED); solar panels; sustainability airports; aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES); Copenhagen Airport; energy; light-emitting diodes (LED); solar panels; sustainability
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Baxter, G.; Srisaeng, P.; Wild, G. An Assessment of Airport Sustainability, Part 2—Energy Management at Copenhagen Airport. Resources 2018, 7, 32.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Resources EISSN 2079-9276 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top