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Resources, Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2012), Pages 1-33

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Resources: An Open Access Journal of Natural Resources and Their Management
Resources 2012, 1(1), 1-2; doi:10.3390/resources1010001
Received: 23 April 2012 / Accepted: 24 April 2012 / Published: 24 April 2012
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Abstract
Resources is an international, peer-reviewed open access journal that publishes original manuscripts, communications, review articles, and policy discussions about all aspects of natural resources and their management. The journal seeks to expand, in a rapid and rigorous way, our understanding of natural [...] Read more.
Resources is an international, peer-reviewed open access journal that publishes original manuscripts, communications, review articles, and policy discussions about all aspects of natural resources and their management. The journal seeks to expand, in a rapid and rigorous way, our understanding of natural endowments, their management, and how they interact with the most personal of resources, the human community. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Calling for Justice in the Goldfields of Tanzania
Resources 2012, 1(1), 3-22; doi:10.3390/resources1010003
Received: 6 November 2012 / Revised: 12 December 2012 / Accepted: 17 December 2012 / Published: 19 December 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1223 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tanzania is the third largest gold exporter in Africa, thanks in part to the liberalization of the mining sector which started in the early 1990s. Neoliberal mining reforms promised a win-win situation in which government, investors and local host communities would benefit [...] Read more.
Tanzania is the third largest gold exporter in Africa, thanks in part to the liberalization of the mining sector which started in the early 1990s. Neoliberal mining reforms promised a win-win situation in which government, investors and local host communities would benefit through export earnings, profits, local employment, and corporate social responsibility initiatives (e.g., the building of schools and clinics). While the rising price of gold and foreign investments in mining activities have delivered on some of these promises, many residents in mining regions have not benefited socioeconomically. Worse still, their communities have unjustly borne the brunt of the environmental, social, and public-health costs associated with large-scale mining operations. This paper examines these injustices through research in Geita and Kahama, two of the most active gold mining areas of Tanzania. Drawing on Kuehn’s [1] taxonomy of environmental injustice, we detail the negative impacts of mining activities in these communities and describe how residents have developed strategies of resistance as means to obtain reparations. We then explore the political, financial, organizational, and social limitations on these resistance strategies and argue that the social movements associated with mining lack the political space necessary to affect significant changes to structure, quality, and impact of the industry in western Tanzania. Full article
Open AccessArticle Resource Criticality and Commodity Production Projections
Resources 2012, 1(1), 23-33; doi:10.3390/resources1010023
Received: 10 November 2012 / Revised: 10 December 2012 / Accepted: 17 December 2012 / Published: 19 December 2012
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (221 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Resource criticality arising from peak production of primary ores is explored in this paper. We combine the Geologic Resource Supply-Demand Model of Mohr [1] to project future resource production for selected commodities in Australia, namely iron and coal which together represent around [...] Read more.
Resource criticality arising from peak production of primary ores is explored in this paper. We combine the Geologic Resource Supply-Demand Model of Mohr [1] to project future resource production for selected commodities in Australia, namely iron and coal which together represent around 50% of the value of total Australian exports as well as copper, gold and lithium. The projections (based on current estimates of ultimately recoverable reserves) indicate that peak production in Australia would occur for lithium in 2015; for gold in 2021; for copper in 2024; for iron in 2039 and for coal in 2060. The quantitative analysis is coupled with the criticality framework for peak minerals of Mason et al. [2] comprising (i) resource availability, (ii) societal resource addiction to commodity use, and (iii) alternatives such as dematerialization or substitution to assess the broader dimension s of peak minerals production for Australia. Full article

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