Next Article in Journal
Electrophoretic Deposition as a New Bioactive Glass Coating Process for Orthodontic Stainless Steel
Previous Article in Journal
Characterization of Hydroxyapatite (HA) Sputtering Targets by APS Methods
Previous Article in Special Issue
Fabrication and Testing of PVA/Chitosan Bilayer Films for Strawberry Packaging
Article Menu
Issue 11 (November) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Coatings 2017, 7(11), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7110196

Effective Postharvest Preservation of Kiwifruit and Romaine Lettuce with a Chitosan Hydrochloride Coating

1
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Perugia, UdR INSTM, Strada di Pentima 4, 05100 Terni, Italy
2
Department of Agriculture and Forestry Science (DAFNE), University of Tuscia, Via S. Camillo De Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Stefano Farris and Lluís Palou
Received: 28 August 2017 / Revised: 8 November 2017 / Accepted: 9 November 2017 / Published: 11 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4066 KB, uploaded 13 November 2017]   |  

Abstract

Kiwifruits and romaine lettuce, among the most horticulturally-consumed fresh products, were selected to investigate how to reduce damage and losses before commercialization. The film-forming properties, physico-chemical, and morphological characteristics, as well as the antimicrobial response against Botrytis cinerea and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum of chitosan hydrochloride (CH)-based coatings were investigated. The results underlined the film-forming capability of this CH that maintained its physico-chemical characteristics also after dissolution in water. Morphological investigations by FESEM (Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy) underlined a well-distributed and homogeneous thin coating (less than 3–5 μm) on the lettuce leaves that do not negatively affect the food product functionality, guaranteeing the normal breathing of the food. FESEM images also highlighted the good distribution of CH coating on kiwifruit peels. The in vitro antimicrobial assays showed that both the mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea and the bacterial growth of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum were totally inhibited by the presence of CH, whereas in vivo antimicrobial properties were proved for 5–7 days on lettuce and until to 20–25 days on kiwifruits, demonstrating that the proposed coating is able to contrast gray mold frequently caused by the two selected plant pathogens during postharvest phases of fruit or vegetable products. View Full-Text
Keywords: chitosan hydrochloride; coating; edible film; food safety; postharvest; antimicrobial properties; Botrytis cinerea; Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum; rotting chitosan hydrochloride; coating; edible film; food safety; postharvest; antimicrobial properties; Botrytis cinerea; Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum; rotting
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Fortunati, E.; Giovanale, G.; Luzi, F.; Mazzaglia, A.; Kenny, J.M.; Torre, L.; Balestra, G.M. Effective Postharvest Preservation of Kiwifruit and Romaine Lettuce with a Chitosan Hydrochloride Coating. Coatings 2017, 7, 196.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Coatings EISSN 2079-6412 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top