Next Article in Journal
Efflux Activity Differentially Modulates the Levels of Isoniazid and Rifampicin Resistance among Multidrug Resistant and Monoresistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains
Next Article in Special Issue
Protein Expression Modifications in Phage-Resistant Mutants of Aeromonas salmonicida after AS-A Phage Treatment
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Protective Effects of Bacteriophages against Aeromonas hydrophila Causing Motile Aeromonas Septicemia (MAS) in Striped Catfish
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Antibiotics 2018, 7(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics7010017

Potential for Bacteriophage Endolysins to Supplement or Replace Antibiotics in Food Production and Clinical Care

1
Biomolecular Interaction Centre and School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand
2
Institute of Environmental Science and Research, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3052, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 6 February 2018 / Accepted: 23 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacteriophages: Alternatives to Antibiotics and Beyond)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [902 KB, uploaded 27 February 2018]   |  

Abstract

There is growing concern about the emergence of bacterial strains showing resistance to all classes of antibiotics commonly used in human medicine. Despite the broad range of available antibiotics, bacterial resistance has been identified for every antimicrobial drug developed to date. Alarmingly, there is also an increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains, rendering some patients effectively untreatable. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop alternatives to conventional antibiotics for use in the treatment of both humans and food-producing animals. Bacteriophage-encoded lytic enzymes (endolysins), which degrade the cell wall of the bacterial host to release progeny virions, are potential alternatives to antibiotics. Preliminary studies show that endolysins can disrupt the cell wall when applied exogenously, though this has so far proven more effective in Gram-positive bacteria compared with Gram-negative bacteria. Their potential for development is furthered by the prospect of bioengineering, and aided by the modular domain structure of many endolysins, which separates the binding and catalytic activities into distinct subunits. These subunits can be rearranged to create novel, chimeric enzymes with optimized functionality. Furthermore, there is evidence that the development of resistance to these enzymes may be more difficult compared with conventional antibiotics due to their targeting of highly conserved bonds. View Full-Text
Keywords: endolysin; antibiotics; antimicrobial resistance; one health; protein engineering endolysin; antibiotics; antimicrobial resistance; one health; protein engineering
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Love, M.J.; Bhandari, D.; Dobson, R.C.J.; Billington, C. Potential for Bacteriophage Endolysins to Supplement or Replace Antibiotics in Food Production and Clinical Care. Antibiotics 2018, 7, 17.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Antibiotics EISSN 2079-6382 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top