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Nanomaterials 2016, 6(11), 196; doi:10.3390/nano6110196

DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

1
Parabon Nanolabs, Huntington, WV 25701, USA
2
Molecular and Biological Imaging Center, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755, USA
3
Department of Natural Sciences, Northeastern State University, Broken Arrow, OK 74014, USA
4
Department of Chemistry, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Leonid Gurevich
Received: 1 July 2016 / Revised: 10 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 31 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA-Based Nanotechnology)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3146 KB, uploaded 31 October 2016]   |  

Abstract

Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material. View Full-Text
Keywords: DNA origami; graphene; graphite; atomic force microscopy; single-stranded DNA; double-stranded DNA; DNA -based nanostructures DNA origami; graphene; graphite; atomic force microscopy; single-stranded DNA; double-stranded DNA; DNA -based nanostructures
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Rahman, M.; Neff, D.; Green, N.; Norton, M.L. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning. Nanomaterials 2016, 6, 196.

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