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J. Intell. 2015, 3(4), 137-157; doi:10.3390/jintelligence3040137

Can Intelligence Testing Inform Educational Intervention for Children with Reading Disability?

1
Collingwood College and School of Education, Durham University, Durham DH13LT, UK
2
Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology, Leiden University, 2333 AK Leiden, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Robert J. Sternberg
Received: 1 July 2015 / Revised: 16 November 2015 / Accepted: 16 November 2015 / Published: 25 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Intelligence Testing)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [718 KB, uploaded 25 November 2015]

Abstract

This paper examines the value of intelligence testing for the purpose of informing us how best to intervene with children with reading disability. While the original function of IQ testing was to ascertain whether a child was capable of profiting from schooling, there are many who now claim that cognitive assessment offers a range of diagnostic and prescriptive functions which can help teachers in delivering effective educational programs. This paper interrogates such assertions in relation to the assessment of IQ, cognitive strengths and weaknesses, executive functions, and the use of dynamic testing/assessment. The paper concludes that current evidence indicates that cognitive measures have limited relevance for instructional planning, and cognitive training programs have yet to show sufficient academic gains. For these reasons, it is recommended that our energies should be directed to the continuing development of powerful forms of academic skills-based instruction operating within a response to intervention framework. View Full-Text
Keywords: intelligence testing; dyslexia; reading disability; executive functions; dynamic assessment intelligence testing; dyslexia; reading disability; executive functions; dynamic assessment
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Elliott, J.G.; Resing, W.C.M. Can Intelligence Testing Inform Educational Intervention for Children with Reading Disability? J. Intell. 2015, 3, 137-157.

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