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Information 2016, 7(2), 26; doi:10.3390/info7020026

The Potential of Three Computer-Based Communication Activities for Supporting Older Adult Independent Living

1
Department of Psychology, Upper Iowa University, Fayette, IA 52142, USA
2
Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, TX 76508, USA
3
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
4
Department of Computer Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
5
Department of Kinesiology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Anna Fensel
Received: 27 April 2016 / Revised: 18 May 2016 / Accepted: 18 May 2016 / Published: 24 May 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Home)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [633 KB, uploaded 24 May 2016]   |  

Abstract

Technology has become an increasingly integral part of life. For example, technology allows individuals to stay in touch with loved ones, obtain medical services through telehealthcare, and enjoy an overall higher quality of life. Particularly for older adults, using technology increases the likelihood that they will maintain their independence and autonomy. Long-distance caregiving has recently become a feasible option where caregivers for older adults can access reports and information about their loved one’s patterns that day (e.g., food and medication intake). Technology may be able to offset age-related challenges (e.g., caregiving, accessing healthcare, decreased social networks) by applying technology to the needs of older adults. Solutions for meeting such challenges, however, have been less targeted. In addition, the healthcare system is evolving to focus on providing options and services in the home. This has direct implications for older adults, as the majority of healthcare services are utilized by older adults. Research is still at the beginning stages of developing successful technology tools that are compatible with older adult users. Therefore, the design, implementation, and outcome of such computer-based communication activities will be discussed in this paper in order to guide future endeavors in technology marketed for older adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: computer-based communication activities; technology; daily health diary; Skype; focus group computer-based communication activities; technology; daily health diary; Skype; focus group
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MDPI and ACS Style

Heinz, M.; Cho, J.; Kelly, N.; Martin, P.; Wong, J.; Franke, W.; Hsieh, W.-H.; Blaser, J. The Potential of Three Computer-Based Communication Activities for Supporting Older Adult Independent Living. Information 2016, 7, 26.

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