Next Article in Journal
Religious Beliefs and Their Relevance for Treatment Adherence in Mental Illness: A Review
Next Article in Special Issue
Black Lesbians to the Rescue! A Brief Correction with Implications for Womanist Christian Theology and Womanist Buddhology
Previous Article in Journal
Auguste Comte and Consensus Formation in American Religious Thought—Part 1: The Creation of Consensus
Article Menu
Issue 8 (August) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Religions 2017, 8(8), 149; doi:10.3390/rel8080149

From the Sacred Sound of the Conch Shell to the Cemetery Dance: Reimagining an Africana Festival Created in a Southern Appalachian City

Department of Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Asheville, 138 Zageir Hall, CPO 2860, One University Heights, Asheville, NC 28804, USA
Received: 2 June 2017 / Revised: 27 July 2017 / Accepted: 8 August 2017 / Published: 14 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race and Religion: New Approaches to African American Religions)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [319 KB, uploaded 16 August 2017]

Abstract

To contemplate African American experience and its many racialized contours is to invoke a tensive quandary concerning the reconstruction of African American cultural identity in a dynamic network of historically assailed African diasporas. Utilizing a transdisciplinary approach that deploys historical analysis as well as cross-cultural and epistemological reflection, this article gestures in such a reconstructive direction from the local vantage point of Asheville, North Carolina’s “African and Caribbean” Goombay Festival. One detects in the festival an exotifying, ambiguously celebratory quality that deprioritizes Affrilachian cultural memory in southern Appalachia in favor of consumable public entertainment. The ensuing argument culminates in a preliminary epistemological reimagining of the Asheville Goombay Festival by way of constructive intercourse with the ancestral spirit-based African Jamaican ritual institution of Gumbay Play, an institution that facilitates processes of identity formation through mnemonically engaged ritual performance. Further, it is argued that this reimagining can amplify the ancestral mnemonic potential of Goombay in Asheville to incorporate more fully the varied Affrilachian lifeworlds of western North Carolina, thereby making possible a reexamination of African American cultural identity in Asheville capable of producing substantive responses to the epistemological challenge of Affrilachian cultural identity formation within western North Carolina’s greater social landscape. View Full-Text
Keywords: African diaspora; African-Jamaican religions; Goombay; Affrilachia; memory; black cultural identity; epistemology African diaspora; African-Jamaican religions; Goombay; Affrilachia; memory; black cultural identity; epistemology
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Harvey, M.L. From the Sacred Sound of the Conch Shell to the Cemetery Dance: Reimagining an Africana Festival Created in a Southern Appalachian City. Religions 2017, 8, 149.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Religions EISSN 2077-1444 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert Logo copyright Steve Bridenbaugh/UUA
Back to Top