Next Article in Journal
Theodicies as Failures of Recognition
Previous Article in Journal
Black Buddhists and the Body: New Approaches to Socially Engaged Buddhism
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Religions 2017, 8(11), 237; doi:10.3390/rel8110237

The Religious and Spiritual Beliefs and Practices among Practitioners across Five Helping Professions

1
Diana R. Garland School of Social Work, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97320, Waco, TX 76798, USA
2
Graduate College of Social Work, University of Houston, 3511 Cullen Blvd, Room 110HA, Houston, TX 77204, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 October 2017 / Revised: 19 October 2017 / Accepted: 23 October 2017 / Published: 31 October 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [246 KB, uploaded 31 October 2017]

Abstract

Helping professionals’ religious and spiritual beliefs and practices have been reported as important components in the consideration of clients’ religion/spirituality (RS) in mental and behavioral health treatment. However, no study to date has simultaneously examined and compared five helping professions’ RS beliefs and practices, including psychologists, social workers, counselors, nurses, and marriage and family therapists. The current study is a secondary analysis of 536 licensed helping professionals in Texas to answer the following questions: (1) What levels of intrinsic religiosity and frequency of religious activities exist across these five professions, and how do they compare?; (2) To what extent do these five professions consider themselves religious or spiritual, and how do they compare?; and (3) What are the religious beliefs and practices across these five professions, and how do they compare? Results indicated significant differences across the five professions with regards to their religious affiliation, frequently used RS practices and activities, degree to which each profession self-identifies as spiritual, as well as intrinsic religiosity. A general comparison between helping professionals’ responses with the general population’s RS is also discussed. Implications based on these findings, as well as recommendations for future studies are included, particularly given the recent movement toward transdisciplinary clinical practice. View Full-Text
Keywords: religion; spirituality; beliefs; clinical practice; counseling; marriage and family therapy; nursing; social work; psychology religion; spirituality; beliefs; clinical practice; counseling; marriage and family therapy; nursing; social work; psychology
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Oxhandler, H.K.; Polson, E.C.; Moffatt, K.M.; Achenbaum, W.A. The Religious and Spiritual Beliefs and Practices among Practitioners across Five Helping Professions. Religions 2017, 8, 237.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Religions EISSN 2077-1444 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert Logo copyright Steve Bridenbaugh/UUA
Back to Top