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Religions 2016, 7(8), 104; doi:10.3390/rel7080104

Buddhist Ritual from Syntax to Cognition: Insight Meditation and Homa

Institute of Buddhist Studies at the Graduate Theological Union, 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA
Academic Editors: Glen A. Hayes and Sthaneshwar Timalsina
Received: 12 April 2016 / Revised: 27 July 2016 / Accepted: 9 August 2016 / Published: 16 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive Science and the Study of Yoga and Tantra)
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Abstract

The concept of “ritual syntax” is developed by relating it to cognitive studies of ritual, providing a fuller theoretical basis. Developing theoretical grounding requires differentiating between the members of five pairs of concepts: production is not the same as analysis, syntax is not the same as semantics, ritual is not the same as the mental, cognition is not the same as the mental, and syntax is not the same as language. These distinctions help avoid overly strong interpretations of the analogy between ritual and language. A discussion of “ritual” suggests that it is best conceptualized in terms of multiple scalar characteristics with degrees of ritualization. Two Buddhist practices, insight meditation and homa, are introduced as instances for the cognitive study of ritual. Syntax involves not simply ordering of elements, but also hierarchical organization of those elements. While syntax allows sentential elements to move within a sentence, ritual tends toward invariance. Invariance seems to contradict the claim that ritual is syntactically organized. However, rituals are often modeled on ordinary activities, producing a kind of “semantic” motivation for invariance. View Full-Text
Keywords: ritual; tantra; syntax; semantics; cognitive linguistics; embodied cognition; insight meditation; homa; Frits Staal; ritual invariance ritual; tantra; syntax; semantics; cognitive linguistics; embodied cognition; insight meditation; homa; Frits Staal; ritual invariance
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Payne, R.K. Buddhist Ritual from Syntax to Cognition: Insight Meditation and Homa. Religions 2016, 7, 104.

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