Next Article in Journal
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Religions in 2015
Next Article in Special Issue
Faith-Based International Development Work: A Review
Previous Article in Journal
The Effect of Prayer on Patients’ Health: Systematic Literature Review
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Religions 2016, 7(1), 13; doi:10.3390/rel7010013

The Intersectionality of Religion and Social Welfare: Historical Development of Richmond’s Nonprofit Health and Human Services

1
School of Social Work, Virginia Commonwealth University, 9534 Oldhouse Drive, Richmond, VA 23238, USA
2
School of Social Work, Virginia Commonwealth University, 2956 Hathaway Road, #706, Richmond, VA 23225, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Robert Wineburg
Received: 27 November 2015 / Revised: 14 January 2016 / Accepted: 14 January 2016 / Published: 21 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion, Welfare and Social Service Provision: Common Ground)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [202 KB, uploaded 21 January 2016]

Abstract

Studying the intersectionality of religion and social welfare in Richmond, Virginia requires going back to the beginning of the Virginia colony. In the crucible of the colony, the religious and social welfare functions of a parish community were one and the same. However, after the Revolutionary War it was just a matter of time before the entire system was disassembled. The process of disentanglement of church and state created an identity crisis in Virginia. In the late 1700s, the emergence of charitable efforts began with leading men of Richmond who tried to address the temporary needs of travelers, followed by groups of women who discovered new roles they could play through charitable works. The new “system” became a potpourri of societies, congregations, associations, and county units attempting to provide for the social welfare of the populous. The intersectionality of religion and social welfare continued as a diverse landscape of small and large organizations and congregations performing the social welfare functions in Richmond and throughout the Commonwealth emerged. Today, to attempt to separate the church from the state in this conglomerate of agencies is neither possible nor desirable. However, understanding its’ historical complexity is essential if one is to engage in contemporary practice within Richmond’s health and human service system. View Full-Text
Keywords: faith-based; social service; history; church-state faith-based; social service; history; church-state
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Netting, F.E.; O’Connor, M.K. The Intersectionality of Religion and Social Welfare: Historical Development of Richmond’s Nonprofit Health and Human Services. Religions 2016, 7, 13.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Religions EISSN 2077-1444 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert Logo copyright Steve Bridenbaugh/UUA
Back to Top