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J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2016, 4(1), 24; doi:10.3390/jmse4010024

Effects of Exposure of Pink Shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duorarum, Larvae to Macondo Canyon 252 Crude Oil and the Corexit Dispersant

1,* , 1,2,†
and
1,3,†
1
Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute at Florida Atlantic University, 5600 US 1 North Fort Pierce, FL 34946, USA
2
Colorado Catch, LLC., PO Box 210, Sanford, CO 81151, USA
3
Fountain Valley School of Colorado, 6155 Fountain Valley School Road, Colorado Springs, CO 80911, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Merv Fingas
Received: 1 January 2016 / Revised: 1 February 2016 / Accepted: 2 February 2016 / Published: 8 March 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Oil Spills)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2009 KB, uploaded 8 March 2016]   |  

Abstract

The release of oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) during the Deepwater Horizon event coincided with the white and pink shrimp spawning season. To determine the potential impact on shrimp larvae a series of static acute (24–96 h) toxicity studies with water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of Macondo Canyon (MC) 252 crude oil, the Corexit 9500A dispersant, and chemically enhanced WAFS (CEWAFs) were conducted with nauplii, zoea, mysid, and postlarval Farfantepenaeus duorarum. Median lethal concentrations (LC50) were calculated and behavior responses (swimming, molting, light sensitivity) evaluated. Impacts were life stage dependent with zoea being the most sensitive. Behavioral responses for all stages, except postlarvae, occurred at below LC50 values. Dispersants had the greatest negative impact while WAFs had the least. No short-term effects (survival, growth) were noted for nauplii exposed to sub-lethal CEWAFs 39 days post-exposure. This study points to the importance of evaluating multiple life stages to assess population effects following contaminant exposure and further, that the use of dispersants as a method of oil removal increases oil toxicity. View Full-Text
Keywords: Farfantepenaeus duorarum; shrimp; DWH; MC252 crude oil; Corexit 9500A dispersant Farfantepenaeus duorarum; shrimp; DWH; MC252 crude oil; Corexit 9500A dispersant
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Laramore, S.; Krebs, W.; Garr, A. Effects of Exposure of Pink Shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duorarum, Larvae to Macondo Canyon 252 Crude Oil and the Corexit Dispersant. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2016, 4, 24.

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