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J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2015, 3(3), 981-1005; doi:10.3390/jmse3030981

The Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment of Urban Environments through Freely Available Datasets: The Case Study of Napoli City (Southern Italy)

1
IAMC—Istituto per l'Ambiente Marino Costiero, CNR, Napoli 80133, Italy
2
Dipartimento di Architettura, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli 80134, Italy
3
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell'Ambiente e delle Risorse Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli 80138, Italy
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Valentin Heller
Received: 19 June 2015 / Accepted: 24 August 2015 / Published: 1 September 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tsunami Science and Engineering)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [10956 KB, uploaded 1 September 2015]   |  

Abstract

The analysis of tsunami catalogues and of data published on the NOAA web site pointed out that in the Mediterranean basin, from 2000 B.C. to present, about 480 tsunamis occurred, of which at least a third involved the Italian peninsula. Within this framework, a GIS-aided procedure that takes advantage of spatial analysis to apply the Papathoma Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment model of urban environments is presented, with the main purpose of assessing the vulnerability of wide areas at spatial resolution of the census district. The method was applied to the sector of Napoli city enclosed between Posillipo Hill and the Somma-Vesuvio volcano because of the high population rates (apex value of 5000 inh/km2) and potential occurrence of hazardous events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and mass failures that can trigger tsunamis. The vulnerability status of the urban environment was depicted on a map. About 21% of the possibly inundated area, corresponding with the lowlands along the shoreline, shows a very high tsunami vulnerability. High vulnerability characterizes 26% of inundable zones while medium-low vulnerability typifies a wide area of the Sebeto-Volla plain, ca 800 m away from the shoreline. This map represents a good tool to plan the actions aimed at reducing risk and promoting resilience of the territory. View Full-Text
Keywords: tsunami; vulnerability; hazard; urban environment; GIS procedure; Napoli city tsunami; vulnerability; hazard; urban environment; GIS procedure; Napoli city
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Alberico, I.; Di Fiore, V.; Iavarone, R.; Petrosino, P.; Piemontese, L.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Marsella, E. The Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment of Urban Environments through Freely Available Datasets: The Case Study of Napoli City (Southern Italy). J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2015, 3, 981-1005.

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