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Agriculture 2017, 7(9), 76; doi:10.3390/agriculture7090076

An Eco-Egalitarian Solution to the Capitalist Consumer Paradox: Integrating Short Food Chains and Public Market Systems

1
Department of Territory and Environment, National Polytechnic Institute, Calle 30 de Junio de 1520 s/n, Barrio La Laguna Ticomán, Mexico City 07340, Mexico
2
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, North Carolina State University, 334 1911 Building, Campus Box 8107, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 August 2017 / Revised: 6 September 2017 / Accepted: 11 September 2017 / Published: 14 September 2017
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Abstract

Presently, alternative agri-food networks are in a renaissance, utilizing an economy of proximity to compete against transnational agri-business and food distributors. While this is positive ecologically and socioeconomically, the overreliance on market mechanisms in short food chains has led to class distinctions in food distribution and consumption. The result has been a capitalist consumer paradox exacerbating inequality in the alternative agri-food networks. To resolve this inequality, we focused on how public policy can leverage state investment in public markets to reduce or overcome the capitalist consumer paradox in short food chains. To clarify our argument, we began by examining the benefits of short food chains in the urban food system. Then, we explained how type of consumption and policy regime effect food access. After this, we utilized Mexico City and New York City’s public market systems as representative of an alternative policy regime and the effects of moving away from state-oriented development. We concluded by describing possible conflicts and complements to the integration of public markets into short urban food chains. View Full-Text
Keywords: short food chains; public market systems; sustainable urban food system; eco-egalitarian policy; capitalist consumer paradox short food chains; public market systems; sustainable urban food system; eco-egalitarian policy; capitalist consumer paradox
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Pensado-Leglise, M.D.R.; Smolski, A. An Eco-Egalitarian Solution to the Capitalist Consumer Paradox: Integrating Short Food Chains and Public Market Systems. Agriculture 2017, 7, 76.

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