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Agriculture 2017, 7(4), 36; doi:10.3390/agriculture7040036

Organic No-Till Systems in Eastern Canada: A Review

1
Département de Phytologie, Université Laval, Québec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
2
Department of Plant Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Patrick Carr
Received: 2 March 2017 / Revised: 18 April 2017 / Accepted: 20 April 2017 / Published: 23 April 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conservation Tillage for Organic Farming)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [707 KB, uploaded 23 April 2017]   |  

Abstract

For more than a decade, studies have aimed to adapt the agronomy of organic no-till systems for the environmental conditions of Eastern Canada. Most research on organic no-till practices in Eastern Canada has been conducted in the province of Québec, where 4% of farms are certified organic, and results from these trials have been published in technical reports available in French. The objective of this review was to revisit previous research work on organic farming in Eastern Canada—the majority of which has been published as technical reports in the French language—in order to highlight important findings and to identify information gaps. Cover crop-based rotational no-till systems for organic grain and horticultural cropping systems will be the main focus of this review. Overall, a few trials have demonstrated that organic rotational no-till can be successful and profitable in warmer and more productive regions of Eastern Canada, but its success can vary over years. The variability in the success of organic rotational no-till systems is the reason for the slow adoption of the system by organic farmers. On-going research focuses on breeding early-maturing fall rye, and terminating cover crops and weeds with the use of bioherbicides. View Full-Text
Keywords: no-till; organic agriculture; roller-crimper; cover crop mulch; rotational no-till; green manure; catch crop; living mulch no-till; organic agriculture; roller-crimper; cover crop mulch; rotational no-till; green manure; catch crop; living mulch
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Halde, C.; Gagné, S.; Charles, A.; Lawley, Y. Organic No-Till Systems in Eastern Canada: A Review. Agriculture 2017, 7, 36.

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