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Agriculture 2017, 7(1), 1; doi:10.3390/agriculture7010001

Can Phosphate Salts Recovered from Manure Replace Conventional Phosphate Fertilizer?

1
Department of Biobased Products and Energy Crops, Institute of Crop Science, University of Hohenheim, Fruwirthstr. 23, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
2
Department of Fertilization and Soil Matter Dynamics, Institute of Crop Science, University of Hohenheim, Fruwirthstr. 20, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
3
Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB, Nobelstr. 12, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Guodong Liu
Received: 16 November 2016 / Revised: 12 December 2016 / Accepted: 16 December 2016 / Published: 7 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enhancing Fertilizer-Use Efficiency in Organic Cropping Systems)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1336 KB, uploaded 7 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

Pig farming produces more manure than can reasonably be spread onto surrounding fields, particularly in regions with high livestock densities and limited land availability. Nutrient recycling offers an attractive solution for dealing with manure excesses and is one main objective of the European commission-funded project “BioEcoSIM”. Phosphate salts (“P-Salt”) were recovered from the separated liquid manure fraction. The solid fraction was dried and carbonized to biochar. This study compared the fertilizing performance of P-Salt and conventional phosphate fertilizer and determined whether additional biochar application further increased biomass yields. The fertilizers and biochar were tested in pot experiments with spring barley and faba beans using two nutrient-poor soils. The crops were fertilized with P-Salt at three levels and biochar in two concentrations. Biomass yield was determined after six weeks. Plant and soil samples were analysed for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium contents. The P-Salt had similar or even better effects than mineral fertilizer on growth in both crops and soils. Slow release of nutrients can prevent leaching, rendering P-Salt a particularly suitable fertilizer for light sandy soils. Biochar can enhance its fertilizing effect, but the underlying mechanisms need further investigation. These novel products are concluded to be promising candidates for efficient fertilization strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: manure; phosphorus recovery; struvite; biochar; spring barley; faba bean manure; phosphorus recovery; struvite; biochar; spring barley; faba bean
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Ehmann, A.; Bach, I.-M.; Laopeamthong, S.; Bilbao, J.; Lewandowski, I. Can Phosphate Salts Recovered from Manure Replace Conventional Phosphate Fertilizer? Agriculture 2017, 7, 1.

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