Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Membranes, Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2012), Pages 1-197

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-7
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Physical Characterization of Mouse Deep Vein Thrombosis Derived Microparticles by Differential Filtration with Nanopore Filters
Membranes 2012, 2(1), 1-15; doi:10.3390/membranes2010001
Received: 28 October 2011 / Revised: 16 December 2011 / Accepted: 22 December 2011 / Published: 27 December 2011
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1142 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the objective of making advancements in the area of pro-thrombotic microparticle characterization in cardiovascular biology, we present a novel method to separate blood circulating microparticles using a membrane-based, nanopore filtration system. In this qualitative study, electron microscopy observations of these pro-thrombotic mouse
[...] Read more.
With the objective of making advancements in the area of pro-thrombotic microparticle characterization in cardiovascular biology, we present a novel method to separate blood circulating microparticles using a membrane-based, nanopore filtration system. In this qualitative study, electron microscopy observations of these pro-thrombotic mouse microparticles, as well as mouse platelets and leukocytes obtained using a mouse inferior vena cava ligation model of deep-vein thrombosis are presented. In particular, we present mouse microparticle morphology and microstructure using SEM and TEM indicating that they appear to be mostly spherical with diameters in the 100 to 350 nm range. The nanopore filtration technique presented is focused on the development of novel methodologies to isolate and characterize blood circulating microparticles that can be used in conjunction with other methodologies. We believe that determination of microparticle size and structure is a critical step for the development of reliable assays with clinical or research application in thrombosis and it will contribute to the field of nanomedicine in thrombosis. Full article

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Stimuli Responsive Ionogels for Sensing Applications—An Overview
Membranes 2012, 2(1), 16-39; doi:10.3390/membranes2010016
Received: 20 December 2011 / Revised: 23 January 2012 / Accepted: 2 February 2012 / Published: 7 February 2012
Cited by 24 | PDF Full-text (649 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This overview aims to summarize the existing potential of “Ionogels” as a platform to develop stimuli responsive materials. Ionogels are a class of materials that contain an Ionic Liquid (IL) confined within a polymer matrix. Recently defined as “a solid interconnected
[...] Read more.
This overview aims to summarize the existing potential of “Ionogels” as a platform to develop stimuli responsive materials. Ionogels are a class of materials that contain an Ionic Liquid (IL) confined within a polymer matrix. Recently defined as “a solid interconnected network spreading throughout a liquid phase”, the ionogel therefore combines the properties of both its solid and liquid components. ILs are low melting salts that exist as liquids composed entirely of cations and anions at or around 100 °C. Important physical properties of these liquids such as viscosity, density, melting point and conductivity can be altered to suit a purpose by choice of the cation/anion. Here we provide an overview to highlight the literature thus far, detailing the encapsulation of IL and responsive materials within these polymeric structures. Exciting applications in the areas of optical and electrochemical sensing, solid state electrolytes and actuating materials shall be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responsive Polymer Membranes)
Open AccessReview Thin Hydrogel Films for Optical Biosensor Applications
Membranes 2012, 2(1), 40-69; doi:10.3390/membranes2010040
Received: 31 December 2011 / Revised: 18 January 2012 / Accepted: 29 January 2012 / Published: 8 February 2012
Cited by 32 | PDF Full-text (628 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hydrogel materials consisting of water-swollen polymer networks exhibit a large number of specific properties highly attractive for a variety of optical biosensor applications. This properties profile embraces the aqueous swelling medium as the basis of biocompatibility, non-fouling behavior, and being not cell toxic,
[...] Read more.
Hydrogel materials consisting of water-swollen polymer networks exhibit a large number of specific properties highly attractive for a variety of optical biosensor applications. This properties profile embraces the aqueous swelling medium as the basis of biocompatibility, non-fouling behavior, and being not cell toxic, while providing high optical quality and transparency. The present review focuses on some of the most interesting aspects of surface-attached hydrogel films as active binding matrices in optical biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance and optical waveguide mode spectroscopy. In particular, the chemical nature, specific properties, and applications of such hydrogel surface architectures for highly sensitive affinity biosensors based on evanescent wave optics are discussed. The specific class of responsive hydrogel systems, which can change their physical state in response to externally applied stimuli, have found large interest as sophisticated materials that provide a complex behavior to hydrogel-based sensing devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responsive Polymer Membranes)
Figures

Open AccessReview Development of Hydrogels and Biomimetic Regulators as Tissue Engineering Scaffolds
Membranes 2012, 2(1), 70-90; doi:10.3390/membranes2010070
Received: 26 December 2011 / Revised: 17 January 2012 / Accepted: 2 February 2012 / Published: 14 February 2012
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (216 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reviews major research and development issues relating to hydrogels as scaffolds for tissue engineering, the article starts with a brief introduction of tissue engineering and hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics, followed by a description of the various types of hydrogels and
[...] Read more.
This paper reviews major research and development issues relating to hydrogels as scaffolds for tissue engineering, the article starts with a brief introduction of tissue engineering and hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics, followed by a description of the various types of hydrogels and preparation methods, before a discussion of the physical and chemical properties that are important to their application. There follows a short comment on the trends of future research and development. Throughout the discussion there is an emphasis on the genetic understanding of bone tissue engineering application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes for Health and Environmental Applications)
Open AccessReview The BAR Domain Superfamily Proteins from Subcellular Structures to Human Diseases
Membranes 2012, 2(1), 91-117; doi:10.3390/membranes2010091
Received: 5 January 2012 / Revised: 7 February 2012 / Accepted: 15 February 2012 / Published: 27 February 2012
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (369 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Eukaryotic cells have complicated membrane systems. The outermost plasma membrane contains various substructures, such as invaginations and protrusions, which are involved in endocytosis and cell migration. Moreover, the intracellular membrane compartments, such as autophagosomes and endosomes, are essential for cellular viability. The Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs167
[...] Read more.
Eukaryotic cells have complicated membrane systems. The outermost plasma membrane contains various substructures, such as invaginations and protrusions, which are involved in endocytosis and cell migration. Moreover, the intracellular membrane compartments, such as autophagosomes and endosomes, are essential for cellular viability. The Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs167 (BAR) domain superfamily proteins are important players in membrane remodeling through their structurally determined membrane binding surfaces. A variety of BAR domain superfamily proteins exist, and each family member appears to be involved in the formation of certain subcellular structures or intracellular membrane compartments. Most of the BAR domain superfamily proteins contain SH3 domains, which bind to the membrane scission molecule, dynamin, as well as the actin regulatory WASP/WAVE proteins and several signal transduction molecules, providing possible links between the membrane and the cytoskeleton or other machineries. In this review, we summarize the current information about each BAR superfamily protein with an SH3 domain(s). The involvement of BAR domain superfamily proteins in various diseases is also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Membrane Morphogenesis)
Figures

Open AccessReview Mechanisms of Membrane Curvature Generation in Membrane Traffic
Membranes 2012, 2(1), 118-133; doi:10.3390/membranes2010118
Received: 29 January 2012 / Revised: 20 February 2012 / Accepted: 21 February 2012 / Published: 29 February 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (226 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
During the vesicular trafficking process, cellular membranes undergo dynamic morphological changes, in particular at the vesicle generation and fusion steps. Changes in membrane shape are regulated by small GTPases, coat proteins and other accessory proteins, such as BAR domain-containing proteins. In addition, membrane
[...] Read more.
During the vesicular trafficking process, cellular membranes undergo dynamic morphological changes, in particular at the vesicle generation and fusion steps. Changes in membrane shape are regulated by small GTPases, coat proteins and other accessory proteins, such as BAR domain-containing proteins. In addition, membrane deformation entails changes in the lipid composition as well as asymmetric distribution of lipids over the two leaflets of the membrane bilayer. Given that P4-ATPases, which catalyze unidirectional flipping of lipid molecules from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflets of the bilayer, are crucial for the trafficking of proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways, changes in the lipid composition are involved in the vesicular trafficking process. Membrane remodeling is under complex regulation that involves the composition and distribution of lipids as well as assembly of proteins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Membrane Morphogenesis)
Open AccessReview Light Responsive Polymer Membranes: A Review
Membranes 2012, 2(1), 134-197; doi:10.3390/membranes2010134
Received: 20 December 2011 / Revised: 4 February 2012 / Accepted: 16 February 2012 / Published: 2 March 2012
Cited by 32 | PDF Full-text (1840 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years, stimuli responsive materials have gained significant attention in membrane separation processes due to their ability to change specific properties in response to small external stimuli, such as light, pH, temperature, ionic strength, pressure, magnetic field, antigen, chemical composition, and so
[...] Read more.
In recent years, stimuli responsive materials have gained significant attention in membrane separation processes due to their ability to change specific properties in response to small external stimuli, such as light, pH, temperature, ionic strength, pressure, magnetic field, antigen, chemical composition, and so on. In this review, we briefly report recent progresses in light-driven materials and membranes. Photo-switching mechanisms, valved-membrane fabrication and light-driven properties are examined. Advances and perspectives of light responsive polymer membranes in biotechnology, chemistry and biology areas are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responsive Polymer Membranes)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Membranes Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
membranes@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Membranes
Back to Top