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Vaccines 2015, 3(3), 556-578; doi:10.3390/vaccines3030556

Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine

1
Center for Community-Based Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave, LW 601, Boston, MA 02215, USA
2
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, University Hall, Rm 233, Oxford St, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA
4
Boston University School of Public Health, 801 Massachusetts Ave., Crosstown Center, Boston, MA 02118, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Diane M. Harper
Received: 5 February 2015 / Revised: 1 July 2015 / Accepted: 6 July 2015 / Published: 15 July 2015
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Abstract

Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly. View Full-Text
Keywords: Vaccine hesitancy; audience segmentation; communication; public engagement; H1N1 Vaccine hesitancy; audience segmentation; communication; public engagement; H1N1
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Ramanadhan, S.; Galarce, E.; Xuan, Z.; Alexander-Molloy, J.; Viswanath, K. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine. Vaccines 2015, 3, 556-578.

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