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Vaccines 2015, 3(1), 137-147; doi:10.3390/vaccines3010137

Beliefs and Opinions of Health Care Workers and Students Regarding Influenza and Influenza Vaccination in Tuscany, Central Italy

1
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Florence, viale GB Morgagni 48, 50134 Florence, Italy
2
Department of Health Science, University of Florence, viale GB Morgagni 48, 50134 Florence, Italy
3
School of Specialization in Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, University of Florence, viale GB Morgagni 48, 50134 Florence, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sarah Gilbert
Received: 26 November 2014 / Revised: 16 January 2015 / Accepted: 12 February 2015 / Published: 26 February 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Influenza Vaccines)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [318 KB, uploaded 26 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

Immunization of health care workers (HCWs) against influenza has been associated with improvements in patient safety. The aim of this study is to assess the beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge of HCWs and health profession students regarding influenza. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to HCWs in three local Florentine healthcare units, at Careggi University Teaching Hospital, and to students in health profession degree programs. A total of 2576 questionnaires were fully completed. A total of 12.3% of subjects responded that they were “always vaccinated” in all three of the seasonal vaccination campaigns studied (2007–2008 to 2009–2010), 13.1% had been vaccinated once or twice, and 74.6% had not received vaccinations. Although the enrolled subjects tended to respond that they were “never vaccinated,” they considered influenza to be a serious illness and believed that the influenza vaccine is effective. The subjects who refused vaccination more frequently believed that the vaccine could cause influenza and that it could have serious side effects. More than 60% of the “always vaccinated” group completely agreed that HCWs should be vaccinated. Self-protection and protecting family members or other people close to the respondent from being infected and representing potential sources of influenza infection can be considered motivating factors for vaccination. The results highlight the importance of improving vaccination rates among all HCWs through multi-component interventions. Knowledge of influenza should be reinforced. View Full-Text
Keywords: attitudes; knowledge; influenza; health care workers; health professions students attitudes; knowledge; influenza; health care workers; health professions students
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Bonaccorsi, G.; Santomauro, F.; Porchia, B.R.; Niccolai, G.; Pellegrino, E.; Bonanni, P.; Lorini, C. Beliefs and Opinions of Health Care Workers and Students Regarding Influenza and Influenza Vaccination in Tuscany, Central Italy. Vaccines 2015, 3, 137-147.

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