Next Article in Journal
Correction: Cecotti, H. and Rivet, B. Subject Combination and Electrode Selection in Cooperative Brain-Computer Interface Based on Event Related Potentials. Brain Sci. 2014, 4, 335–355
Next Article in Special Issue
Early Word Recognition and Later Language Skills
Previous Article in Journal
Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Brain Sci. 2014, 4(3), 471-487; doi:10.3390/brainsci4030471

Dissociating Cortical Activity during Processing of Native and Non-Native Audiovisual Speech from Early to Late Infancy

1
Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 135 Hicks Way, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
2
Department of Psychology, Texas A&M University, 4235 TAMU, College Station, TX 77845, USA
3
Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, 406 Babbidge Road, Unit 1020, Storrs, CT 06269-1020, USA
4
Haskins Laboratories, 300 George St #900, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 February 2014 / Revised: 27 June 2014 / Accepted: 14 July 2014 / Published: 11 August 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognition in Infants)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [650 KB, uploaded 11 August 2014]   |  

Abstract

Initially, infants are capable of discriminating phonetic contrasts across the world’s languages. Starting between seven and ten months of age, they gradually lose this ability through a process of perceptual narrowing. Although traditionally investigated with isolated speech sounds, such narrowing occurs in a variety of perceptual domains (e.g., faces, visual speech). Thus far, tracking the developmental trajectory of this tuning process has been focused primarily on auditory speech alone, and generally using isolated sounds. But infants learn from speech produced by people talking to them, meaning they learn from a complex audiovisual signal. Here, we use near-infrared spectroscopy to measure blood concentration changes in the bilateral temporal cortices of infants in three different age groups: 3-to-6 months, 7-to-10 months, and 11-to-14-months. Critically, all three groups of infants were tested with continuous audiovisual speech in both their native and another, unfamiliar language. We found that at each age range, infants showed different patterns of cortical activity in response to the native and non-native stimuli. Infants in the youngest group showed bilateral cortical activity that was greater overall in response to non-native relative to native speech; the oldest group showed left lateralized activity in response to native relative to non-native speech. These results highlight perceptual tuning as a dynamic process that happens across modalities and at different levels of stimulus complexity. View Full-Text
Keywords: near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS); perceptual narrowing; infancy; audiovisual speech perception; language; language development; speech perception near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS); perceptual narrowing; infancy; audiovisual speech perception; language; language development; speech perception
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Fava, E.; Hull, R.; Bortfeld, H. Dissociating Cortical Activity during Processing of Native and Non-Native Audiovisual Speech from Early to Late Infancy. Brain Sci. 2014, 4, 471-487.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Brain Sci. EISSN 2076-3425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top