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Adm. Sci., Volume 4, Issue 2 (June 2014), Pages 73-172

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Research

Open AccessArticle It Does Matter How You Get to the Top: Differentiating Status from Reputation
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 73-86; doi:10.3390/admsci4020073
Received: 30 September 2013 / Revised: 19 February 2014 / Accepted: 28 February 2014 / Published: 4 April 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (156 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Status and reputation have long been recognized as important influences in management research and recently much attention has been paid to defining the two concepts and understanding how they are utilized by organizations. However, few strategic management studies have identified the different [...] Read more.
Status and reputation have long been recognized as important influences in management research and recently much attention has been paid to defining the two concepts and understanding how they are utilized by organizations. However, few strategic management studies have identified the different methods through which status and reputation are constructed. While reputation has been linked with a history of quality, and status has been identified as an externally assigned measure of social position, empirical studies have been highly idiosyncratic in their identification of the mechanisms used to obtain either construct. This paper attempts to rectify that gap in the literature by identifying two distinct methods used to obtain reputation and status. We argue that certification contests can be used to increase organizational reputation and tournament rituals can be used to increase organizational status. We build theoretical propositions regarding the use of certification contexts and tournament rituals to show how reputation and status are achieved through similar, but distinct, methods and further the research on teasing apart these two important and intertwined concepts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organizations, Stakeholders and Public Affairs)
Open AccessArticle Toward a Collaborative, Transformative Model of Non-Profit Leadership: Some Conceptual Building Blocks
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 87-104; doi:10.3390/admsci4020087
Received: 20 May 2013 / Revised: 24 March 2014 / Accepted: 28 March 2014 / Published: 8 April 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (332 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, the authors propose extending the construct of non-profit leadership to accommodate collaborative and transformational themes. The suggestion is that the resultant broader definition accords with the modern context within which non-profits now operate and feeds into a more resilient [...] Read more.
In this paper, the authors propose extending the construct of non-profit leadership to accommodate collaborative and transformational themes. The suggestion is that the resultant broader definition accords with the modern context within which non-profits now operate and feeds into a more resilient model of non-profit leadership. The paper begins with a review of emergent trends in leadership theory and the changing context of the non-profit sector. The argument is made that the extraordinary challenges facing the sector signal the need for fresh new perspectives in leadership. The authors then proceed to examine the significance of a nascent non-profit culture point to a re-alignment of the sector that is informed by transformational principles and a values-orientation. The result is said to be a new model of non-profit and public sector leadership that raises important methodological questions which the authors maintain can inform future analyses of the structure, role, and responsibilities of non-profit leadership. Finally, a world of new possibilities is envisioned, one in which non-profit organizations are strategically repositioned to take advantage of a new values-based ethic that is rooted in principles of integrity, increased self-awareness, a collaborative agenda, intentionality, emphasis of followership, cultural competence, and orientation toward the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leadership in Non-Profit Organizations)
Open AccessArticle Have You Switched to a Low-Carbon Diet? The Ultimate Value of Low-Carbon Consumerism
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 105-119; doi:10.3390/admsci4020105
Received: 11 February 2014 / Revised: 11 April 2014 / Accepted: 14 April 2014 / Published: 17 April 2014
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Abstract
Since the 1990s many governments around the world have been encouraging their people to participate in green or low carbon living. With the background of rising consumer awareness in environmental protection, green consumption, and green marketing are receiving growing attention from consumers [...] Read more.
Since the 1990s many governments around the world have been encouraging their people to participate in green or low carbon living. With the background of rising consumer awareness in environmental protection, green consumption, and green marketing are receiving growing attention from consumers and enterprises. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to identify the goals and values of 60 Taiwanese consumers in a low-carbon diet. This study uses the theory of Mean-end chain as basis, applying the “Soft-laddering” of “Laddering” to understand the perceived value of low carbon food in depth interviews. The results revealed that the attributes of users care for green living in the, order of, Less meat more vegetables, Seasonal food, Local food, Food with minimal artificial processing, Energy-saving preparation and Carbon footprint. After classifying by content analysis, we draw the Hierarchical value map (HVM) to explore that consumer’s pursuit of the final value and benefits by adopting a low-carbon diet relate to healthy living. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Management)
Open AccessArticle Leading, Following or Complementing in Economic Crisis: A Conceptual Model Illustrating Nonprofit Relationships with Public Schools
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 120-136; doi:10.3390/admsci4020120
Received: 21 February 2014 / Revised: 21 April 2014 / Accepted: 5 May 2014 / Published: 14 May 2014
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Abstract
Public and nonprofit organizations, entwined in the delivery of public goods and services, are in the midst of challenging economic times. In these circumstances, sound collaborative leadership may help bridge budget and program service delivery shortfalls. In this paper, we examine the [...] Read more.
Public and nonprofit organizations, entwined in the delivery of public goods and services, are in the midst of challenging economic times. In these circumstances, sound collaborative leadership may help bridge budget and program service delivery shortfalls. In this paper, we examine the administrative dynamics of mutual reliance between two prominent public and nonprofit organizations: public schools and parent-teacher groups (PTGs). We conclude that the partnership is changing as a result of external, economic forces. In essence, we are seeing a threat-rigidity response. The economic crisis may be responsible for causing PTGs to narrow their range of activities away from broader strategic issues that can be addressed through their confrontation activities and advocacy mission towards a narrower focus on classroom activities that protect core school operations, namely instruction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leadership in Non-Profit Organizations)
Open AccessArticle Stakeholder Valuing: A Process for Identifying the Interrelationships between Firm and Stakeholder Attributes
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 137-154; doi:10.3390/admsci4020137
Received: 6 December 2013 / Revised: 9 May 2014 / Accepted: 13 May 2014 / Published: 26 May 2014
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Abstract
As firms are creating and recreating themselves as stakeholder corporations, tensions mount between a firm’s fiduciary duties to its shareholders and the broader responsibilities inherent in a stakeholder focus. Firms have employed several techniques to help resolve this tension with limited success. [...] Read more.
As firms are creating and recreating themselves as stakeholder corporations, tensions mount between a firm’s fiduciary duties to its shareholders and the broader responsibilities inherent in a stakeholder focus. Firms have employed several techniques to help resolve this tension with limited success. We suggest that the next step in reducing this tension is formally accounting for stakeholder value through changes in financial reporting. We contend that stakeholders have a financial value to the firm that can and should be accounted for through the firm’s financial reporting system. We propose a three-step process we call stakeholder valuing (SV) to begin a conversation regarding how such a method can be created. SV begins with codifying the firm’s identity as a stakeholder entity, moves to assessing stakeholder value that’s consistent with that identity, and concludes with accounting for and reporting that value. What we are suggesting will be seen by some as a radical change in accounting practices but we believe it is necessary as we move toward a consistent, reliable, verifiable, transparent, and comparable means of accounting for the true value of a stakeholder corporation. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle Positioning in the Global Value Chain as a Sustainable Strategy: A Case Study in a Mature Industry
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 155-172; doi:10.3390/admsci4020155
Received: 4 November 2013 / Revised: 5 May 2014 / Accepted: 22 May 2014 / Published: 19 June 2014
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Abstract
As a result of the development of new industrialized countries, such as Brazil, China and other Southern Asian economies, as well as a globalized economy, traditional competitive paradigms based on advantages associated with costs and quality efficiencies or even innovation are no [...] Read more.
As a result of the development of new industrialized countries, such as Brazil, China and other Southern Asian economies, as well as a globalized economy, traditional competitive paradigms based on advantages associated with costs and quality efficiencies or even innovation are no longer sufficient. These previous classical paradigms related competitiveness either to costs or technology innovation and the resources of industry incumbents. However, the combination of adequate knowledge and relationship management with marketing efforts brings forth a reconsideration of the present competitive models that go beyond those analyses from the point of view of global value chains. The objective of this investigation will analyze the governance structure of the territorial value chain in the Spanish and Italian ceramic tile industry, through the understanding of the previous and current roles of several industries involved in the value creation system. By way of both a case study and quantitative methodology approach, we will explore the paradigm change where traditional chain actors are losing their grip on their contribution to the territorial value creation system as new actors appear with a more stable status. The article concludes that proper positioning in the global value chain is a key strategy for the sustainability of the involved firms, especially Small and Medium Enterprises (SME). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Global Value Chain)

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