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Behav. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 190-202; doi:10.3390/bs5020190

Measuring Physical Neighborhood Quality Related to Health

1
School of Architecture, University of Notre Dame, 110 Bond Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA
2
Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University, 1411 Martha Van Rensselaer Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
3
Design and Environmental Analysis, Human Development, and the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, Cornell University, 1411 Martha Van Rensselaer Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jack Nasar
Received: 14 March 2015 / Revised: 21 April 2015 / Accepted: 22 April 2015 / Published: 29 April 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Psychology)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [61 KB, uploaded 29 April 2015]

Abstract

Although sociodemographic factors are one aspect of understanding the effects of neighborhood environments on health, equating neighborhood quality with socioeconomic status ignores the important role of physical neighborhood attributes. Prior work on neighborhood environments and health has relied primarily on level of socioeconomic disadvantage as the indicator of neighborhood quality without attention to physical neighborhood quality. A small but increasing number of studies have assessed neighborhood physical characteristics. Findings generally indicate that there is an association between living in deprived neighborhoods and poor health outcomes, but rigorous evidence linking specific physical neighborhood attributes to particular health outcomes is lacking. This paper discusses the methodological challenges and limitations of measuring physical neighborhood environments relevant to health and concludes with proposed directions for future work. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical neighborhood environment; health; measurement; causality; spatial scale physical neighborhood environment; health; measurement; causality; spatial scale
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Rollings, K.A.; Wells, N.M.; Evans, G.W. Measuring Physical Neighborhood Quality Related to Health. Behav. Sci. 2015, 5, 190-202.

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